Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute e-Newsletter - If you have problems reading this issue, please visit: http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/old

SEPTEMBER 2006 E-NEWSLETTER

IN THIS ISSUE

1. Law, Policy & Practice
- Bush Signs Bill Reauthorizing Child Welfare Funding to States
- New California Laws Aim to Protect and Improve Lives of Foster Youth
- Massachusetts Allows Adoption Placements by For-Profit Agencies
- U.S. Adoption Incentives Awarded, Decrease from Previous Year
- Australian Government Reportedly Will Take Over Foreign Adoptions

2. Research
- Institute Report Recommends Adoption Training for Educators
- Study Tracks Effects of Institutionalization as Children Age
- Article Views Adoption as Part of Answer for Africa’s Aids Orphans
- Adolescents in Open Adoptions Report Fewer Adjustment Problems
- Surveys Show 48% of Girls in Foster Care Get Pregnant by Age 19
- Research Finds Sibling Issues are Major Predictor of Disruptions
- Analysis of Barriers to Successful Adoptions Recommends Strategies

3. News
- New Regulations in Japan Aim to Restrict Adoption Profiteering
- Guatemala Rumor of Halt to International Adoptions Unfounded
- Korea Reportedly to Suspend Second Child Adoption Temporarily
- Romania Orphans’ Testimony Challenges Ban on Overseas Adoption

4. Resources
- Two Websites Offer Resources for National Adoption Month
- AdoptUsKids Offers Practice Strategies for the Adoption Process
- Casey Offers Online Tools to Prepare and Support Foster Families
- Directory Provides Information on Array of Adoption Topics
- Eight Edition of Council on Accreditation Standards Now on Web
- First Child Welfare Law Specialists Certified in the Nation

5. Institute Update
- ‘Adoption in the Schools’ Promotes Equity and Fairness for All Kids
- Institute Criticizes California Bill to Extend Legalized Abandonment
- Openness in Adoption Seen Growing, But Legacy of Secrecy Lingers
- New Book Includes Pertman Chapter on Adoption in the Media
- Brodzinsky Joins Institute, Two Senior Staff Receive ‘Angels’ Awards
- Executive Director to Keynote at Southern Regional Conference
- Adoption Institute: Growing Onward and Upward

6. About the Evan D. Donaldson Adoption Institute

1. Law, Policy & Practice
BUSH SIGNS BILL REAUTHORIZING CHILD WELFARE FUNDING TO STATES
President George Bush signed into law (P.L. No.109-288) “The Children and Families Services Improvement Act of 2006” (S3525), reauthorizing the Promoting Safe and Stable Families (PSSF) program. PSSF provides funding to states for time-limited reunification services, adoption promotion and support services, family preservation, and family support services. Signed on Sept. 28, the legislation reauthorizes the program through 2011, and allocates $305 millions in mandatory funds (given automatically and not subject to the annual budget appropriations process) and $200 million in funds authorized and approved annually by Congress. In addition, the legislation includes funds for two $10 million court improvement grants, a competitive grant program of $20 million to $40 million a year to address substance abuse, and a state grant program of $5 million to $20 million to address workforce issues. To read the bill text, go to: http://www.govtrack.us/congress/billtext.xpd?bill=s109-3525; to read a summary of the PSSF program, go to: http://www.cwla.org/advocacy/pssfsummary06.htm

NEW CALIFORNIA LAWS AIM TO PROTECT AND IMPROVE LIVES OF FOSTER YOUTH
California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger signed a series of bills into law on Sept. 22 intended to better the lives of youth in foster care by: improving coordination of child welfare services (AB2488), eliminating barriers to maintaining connections with siblings (AB1979), encouraging mentorship by waiving the fee for criminal background checks (AB1979), and providing protection from identity theft (AB2985). In addition, the governor signed legislation to protect children at risk of out-of-home placements by ensuring: children and youth in foster care live in family environments (SB1641), have access to an attorney during dependency proceedings at the appellate level (AB2480), and expedite placement of foster youth with relatives (SB1667). In October 2005, the governor had signed another package of legislation to promote permanency for foster children, support foster youth aging out of the system, and add $13 million to the state budget to improve local foster care programs. To read the press release and links to the bills, go to: http://gov.ca.gov/index.php?/press-release/4015/ or go to http://www.legislature.ca.gov/port-bilinfo.html and search by bill number

MASSACHUSETTS ALLOWS ADOPTION PLACEMENTS BY FOR-PROFIT AGENCIES
Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney signed a bill on Sept. 7 that will permit for-profit agencies to place children for adoption and compete for state foster care contracts. The measure, which was part of an economic development bill, amends the definition of “placement agency,” which previously limited child placements to nonprofit agencies. The provision was passed by the state House and Senate in late August without a public hearing. In November 2005, President Bush signed federal legislation (P.L. No. 109-113) permitting for-profit foster care agencies to receive Medicaid funds and federal foster care grants and assistance. To read the Massachusetts legislation (Chapter 293 of the Acts of 2006) go to: http://www.mass.gov/legis/laws/seslaw06/sl060293.htm; to read a Boston Globe article on the law, go to: http://www.boston.com/news/local/articles/2006/09/17/for_profits_to_compete_in_child_
placements/?page=1


U.S. ADOPTION INCENTIVES AWARDED, DECREASE FROM PREVIOUS YEAR
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services awarded 21 states a total of $11.6 million in Adoption Incentive bonuses for increasing the number of children adopted from foster care last year. Texas received $4 million, the most money of any state, followed by Tennessee ($1.5 million) and Arizona ($1 million). The awards, announced on Sept. 8, were given to states that completed more adoptions in FY05 than in the state's baseline year (the higher total between 2002 through 2004). States receive $4,000 for each child adopted beyond its baseline or best annual total, plus $4,000 for every child aged 9 and older, and $2,000 for each special needs child adopted above the baseline year. Last year, HHS awarded $14.6 million to 24 states. The total estimated number of child welfare adoptions increased in FY05 to just below 51,500, up from 50,700 in FY04. For a complete list of states and awards, go to: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/news/press/2006/adoption_incentive_prog.htm

AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT REPORTEDLY WILL TAKE OVER FOREIGN ADOPTIONS
State and local territory governments in Australia will be stripped of their responsibility of managing overseas adoption programs, with the federal government assuming responsibility of the system, according to a report published in the Australian paper The Age. “States Lose on Adoption,” published on Sept. 15, reports states will retain responsibility for day-to-day processing and management of individual applications, including assessing applicants. The decision to centralize management of the overseas adoption programs was based on recommendations from a study conducted by a House of Representatives committee last November, which found a general lack of support for adoptions among local governments. To read the House committee report on overseas adoption, go to: http://www.aph.gov.au/house/committee/fhs/adoption/report.htm; to read The Age article, go to: http://www.theage.com.au/news/national
/states-lose-on-adoption/2006/09/14/1157827093119.html#

2. Research
INSTITUTE REPORT RECOMMENDS ADOPTION TRAINING FOR EDUCATORS
The Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute published a report focusing on the educational needs of adopted and foster children in schools, and recommended responses that would maximize their success in the classroom. “Adoption in the Schools: A Lot to Learn,” researched and written by Susan Livingston Smith, the Institute’s Program and Project Director, in collaboration with Debbie Riley, Executive Director of the Center for Adoption Support and Education. It reports data indicating that adopted and foster children are more likely to have unmet educational needs than their peers growing up in biological families. Their experiences at school have great impact on their self-concept, peer group experience, ability to learn, and relationships with parents. The report concludes that teachers and other school professionals need systematic education to adequately address the needs of adopted and foster children. To access, go to: http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/old/policy/2006_09_adoption_in_the_schools.php

STUDY TRACKS EFFECTS OF INSTITUTIONALIZATION AS CHILDREN AGE
An English study investigated the long-term impact of institutionalization on cognitive functioning of adopted children. By analyzing IQ scores at ages 6 and 11 for 131 children adopted from Romania and 50 adopted children born in England, researchers found that those children with over six months in an orphanage scored at least an average of 15 points lower than others. “Do the Effects of Early Severe Deprivation on Cognition Persist Into Early Adolescence? Findings from the English and Romanian Adoptees Study,” authored by Celia Beckett and nine other researchers, was published in the May/June issue of Child Development (Volume, 77, Issue 3). The study did not find significant differences at age 11 between children institutionalized between 6-24 months and those with over 24 months in institutions. Also, those institutionalized less than 6 months were not significantly different than U.K. born adoptees. To access a free abstract, go to: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2006.00898.x

ARTICLE VIEWS ADOPTION AS PART OF ANSWER FOR AFRICA’S AIDS ORPHANS
Two social workers, one of whom has conducted research on orphan care in Africa, examined the extent to which international adoption can play a role in addressing the needs of African children orphaned by AIDS, and conclude that this option needs to be considered as a short-term, small part of the solution. “The African Orphan Crisis and International Adoption,” by Jini Roby and Stacey Shaw, was published in the most recent issue of Social Work (Volume 51, Issue 3). While only a handful of African countries participate in international adoption into the U.S., a few – including Ethiopia, South Africa, Kenya and Liberia – have allowed a small number. In 2004, UNICEF released a position statement supporting intercountry adoption under certain circumstances. To access an abstract, go to: http://titania.naswpressonline.org/vl=2212258/cl=11/nw=1/rpsv/cw/nasw/00378046/
v51n3/s2/p199


ADOLESCENTS IN OPEN ADOPTIONS REPORT FEWER ADJUSTMENT PROBLEMS
The first study of psychological adjustment of 92 adopted adolescents in different types of contact arrangements found no differences by level of openness according to parental reports; however, youth reports indicated that those with long-term direct contact had lower levels of externalizing problems. “Openness Arrangements and Psychological Adjustment in Adolescent Adoptees,” by Lynn Von Korff, Harold Grotevant, and Ruth McRoy – the latter two researchers are Adoption Institute Senior Fellows – was published in the September issue of the Journal of Family Psychology (Volume 20, Issue 3). Adolescents in open adoptions were most likely to have contact with their birthmothers (96 percent), and the majority had contact with birth grandparents and siblings. Only 27 percent had contact with birthfathers. For a free abstract, go to: http://content.apa.org/journals/fam

SURVEYS SHOW 48% OF GIRLS IN FOSTER CARE GET PREGNANT BY AGE 19
Researchers at Chapin Hall Center for Children analyzed data from their survey of 732 19-year olds (either in care or recently exited) and from a national study of adolescents to examine the rate of sexual activity, pregnancy and parenthood among foster youth. By age 19, 48 percent of teen foster girls have been pregnant, compared to a fifth of their peers. “Science Says: Foster Care Youth,” by Lucy Bilaver and Mark Courtney was published by the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy in its August issue of Putting What Works to Work.” They found that rates of contraceptive use are equal between teen girls in foster care and others. More foster youth had received family planning services (15 percent as compared to 7.5 percent of others). Also those leaving the system by age 19 were found to be at higher risk for pregnancy than those remaining in the system. To access, go to: http://www.teenpregnancy.org/works/pdf/ScienceSays27_FosterCare.pdf

RESEARCH FINDS SIBLING ISSUES ARE MAJOR PREDICTOR OF DISRUPTIONS
A longitudinal study of approximately 100 English children placed for adoption between the ages of 5 and 11 with new, unrelated families found that the most powerful predictor of disruption was being singled out from siblings for mistreatment by parents and being placed apart from their sibling groups (5.9 greater odds of disruption). “The Adoption of Children from Public Care: A Prospective Study of Outcome in Adolescence,” by Alan Rushton and Cherilyn Dance, was published in the July issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Volume 45, Issue 7). Outcomes for 99 children followed for six years were: 23 disrupted, 48 had a positive adjustment, and 28 continued with substantial difficulties. Other factors related to disruption included older age at placement, longer time in care, and a high level of behavior problems. For a free abstract, go to: http://www.jaacap.com/

ANALYSIS OF BARRIERS TO SUCCESSFUL ADOPTIONS RECOMMENDS STRATEGIES
“Confronting Barriers to Adoption Success,” by Judith Rycus, Madelyn Freundlich (an Adoption Institute Senior Fellow), Ronald Hughes, Betsy Keefer and Emily Oakes, analyzes the most common barriers to successful adoption outcomes and recommends strategies to address them. This article, published in April’s Family Court Review (Volume 44, Issue 2) examines three categories of obstacles: organizational and intersystem barriers, lack of specialized services to address families’ needs, and lack of knowledge regarding adoption dynamics and factors that strengthen adoptions. Some recommendations include: development of a national and international adoption research agenda, particularly focusing on intervention strategies; promoting education of professionals serving adoptive families; organizational problem-solving to address barriers, and helping adoptive families build support networks. To order this article for a fee, go to: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/toc/fcre/44/2

3. News
NEW REGULATIONS IN JAPAN AIM TO RESTRICT ADOPTION PROFITEERING
The Japanese Health, Labor and Welfare Ministry drafted a set of guidelines in late August that specifically restrict expenses that adoption agencies can charge adoptive parents involved in domestic or overseas adoptions to 10 items, and prohibit agencies from receiving money before an adoption is completed. According to the Sept. 22 Daily Yomiuri article, “Adoption Profiteers Face Government Curbs,” by Masaki Takakura, the new guidelines – the first of their kind – were drafted in an attempt to clamp down on unscrupulous agencies and to comply with the Child Welfare Law, which prohibits profiting from adoption. A total of 335 adoptions were arranged in Japan between fiscal year 2001 and 2004, of which 76 were from overseas. To read the article, go to: http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/dy/national/20060922TDY04002.htm

GUATELMALA RUMOR OF HALT TO INTERNATIONAL ADOPTIONS UNFOUNDED
The U.S. State Department released a notice saying the Guatemalan government has officially confirmed that it is not halting international adoptions in its efforts to implement the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption, and that the rumor that adoptions would be suspended was untrue. According to a report on the website of the organization Ethica, a fake letter on Guatemalan presidential letterhead had been circulating to prospective adoptive parents asserting that adoptions would be halted by Oct. 1. It is believed the letter may have been intended to extort money from adoptive parents with pending cases. To read the State Department notice, go to: http://travel.state.gov/family/adoption/notices/notices_3042.html; to read the report on Ethica, go to: http://www.ethicanet.org/newslist.php?pagestyle=default#2006-09-29

KOREA REPORTEDLY TO SUSPEND SECOND CHILD ADOPTION TEMPORARILY
Adoption agencies in Korea have suspended all new cases of intercountry adoption by Australian applicants who already have one Korean-born child, although pending cases already received by Korean authorities will be processed, according to a Sept. 17 Sydney Morning Herald article. “Adoption Heartache for Hundreds,” by Erin O’Dwyer, reports the decision to suspend a second adoption by the same family overseas is temporary and that falling birth rates and new policies promoting domestic adoption and support for single mothers were reasons for the suspension. The article reports the suspension will affect all adoptions, including prospective parents in the United States. To read the article, go to: http://www.smh.com.au/news/national/adoption-heartache-for-hundreds/2006/09/16/
1158334735676.html


ROMANIA ORPHANS’ TESTIMONY CHALLENGES BAN ON OVERSEAS ADOPTION
Eleven Romanian orphans who had been approved for overseas adoption with families in Italy, France and the United States submitted written testimony to members of the European parliament in September about how their lives were devastated because of Romania’s 2001 ban on international adoption. According to the article published in the U.K. Times, “Romania’s Orphans Claim Years of Abuse,” by Bob Graham, instead of growing up in loving homes overseas, the orphans (aged 14 to 20) described years of sexual and physical abuse as former residents of an orphanage in the town of Brasov. The complaints coincided with the European parliament’s decision on Romania’s entry to the European Union and have spurred new discussion about Romania’s ban on intercountry adoption. The orphans’ allegations of abuse are being investigated by Romania’s police and its National Authority for the Protection of Children’s Rights. To read the article, go to: http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2089-2372123,00.html

4. Resources
TWO WEBSITES OFFER RESOURCES FOR NATIONAL ADOPTION MONTH
Resources for National Adoption Awareness Month (November) are available on both the Child Welfare Information Gateway and the North American Council for Adoptable Children (NACAC) websites. The first resource, developed by the Adoption Exchange Association and the Collaboration to AdoptUsKids, contains suggested activities, public service announcements developed by the Ad Council, and a wide variety of resources for recruitment, preparation, and retention of foster and adoptive parents. Spanish resources also are available. On NACAC’s website is a National Adoption Awareness Month Guide, published originally in 2001. A printed copy of the guide may be purchased for $10 or can be accessed online. To access the resources on the Child Welfare Information Gateway, go to: http;//www.childwelfare.gov/adoption/nam; to get the NACAC guide online, go to: http://www.nacac.org/resources_adoptionmonth.html

ADOPTUSKIDS OFFERS PRACTICE STRATEGIES FOR THE ADOPTION PROCESS
A new publication from AdoptUsKids, Finding a Fit that Will Last a Lifetime: A Guide to Connecting Adoptive Families with Waiting Children, by Sarah Gerstenzang and Madelyn Freundlich, focuses on ideal practices in the placement process and preparation of adoptive families for waiting children. Some of the topics covered include guidelines for matching, child and family preparation, and sharing and interpreting information about the child with prospective adoptive parents. The Appendix includes five worksheets to use in the placement process. To access, go to: http://www.adoptuskids.org/content_images/my_page_social_worker/FindingAFit.pdf

CASEY OFFERS ONLINE TOOLS TO PREPARE AND SUPPORT FOSTER FAMILIES
Casey Family Programs and social work researchers at the University of Tennessee have developed standardized measures for assessing, preparing, and supporting prospective foster families. These measures, which can be taken online or down-loaded, include the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory (CFAI) and the Casey Home Assessment Protocol (CHAP). The CHAP combines standardized scales assessing a range of competencies such as family functioning, social support, physical and mental health, cultural competency and others. Casey also offers professional training on the use of these tools. To access these resources, go to: http://www.fosterfamilyassessments.org/

DIRECTORY PROVIDES INFORMATION ON ARRAY OF ADOPTION TOPICS
The National Child Welfare Resource Center for Adoption has provided a directory of resources at the Child Welfare Information Gateway on 13 adoption topics, such as kinship adoption, open adoption, adoption assistance, post-adoption assistance, and others. The Child Welfare Information Gateway also added several new and updated publications in August. These include a bulletin for professionals, “The Basics of Adoption Practice,” and two fact sheets for families, “Intercountry Adoption: Where Do I Start?” and “Postadoption Services.” To access the NCWRC for Adoption resource, go to: http://www.nrcadoption.org/resources/publications.htm; ; to access the publications on the Gateway website, go to: http://www.childwelfare.gov/index.cfm

EIGHTH EDITION OF COUNCIL ON ACCREDITATION STANDARDS NOW ON WEB
The latest edition of Council on Accreditation Standards for both public agencies and private organizations has been posted on the organization’s website. To access, go to: http://www.coastandards.org/

FIRST CHILD WELFARE LAW SPECIALISTS CERTIFIED IN THE NATION
In June the National Association of Counsel for Children (NACC) awarded for the first time specialty certifications in child welfare to 85 lawyers in California, New Mexico and Michigan who participated in NACC’s pilot program. In 2001 the American Bar Association recognized Child Welfare Law as a specialty and in 2004 NACC was accredited as the certifying body. For more information on the certification and list of certified lawyers, go to: http://www.naccchildlaw.org/training/certification.html

5. Institute Update
`ADOPTION IN THE SCHOOLS’ PROMOTES EQUITY AND FAIRNESS FOR ALL KIDS
The Adoption Institute released a new report at the end of September calling on schools to be more responsive to the needs of adopted and foster children and to increase their knowledge about adoption. The report, "Adoption in the Schools: A Lot to Learn," for the first time brings together research and years of broad experience on a range of issues that affect millions of people nationwide and offers recommendations for how educators can better meet those challenges. In a related article, “Creating a Classroom for Adopted and Non-Adopted Students,” by Elizabeth Hunt, published Sept. 1 on the website RainbowKids.com, Adoption Institute Executive Director Adam Pertman states that adoption is a “prism through which to view American families today.” To read the press release on the Institute report, go to: http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/old/media/20060927_adoptionschoolsbrief.php to access the report, go to: http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/old/policy/2006_09_adoption_in_the_schools.php; to read the RainbowKids article, go to: http://www.rainbowkids.com/ArticleDetails.aspx?id=43

INSTITUTE CRITICIZES CALIFORNIA BILL TO EXTEND LEGALIZED ABANDONMENT
Executive Director Pertman was quoted in two articles in September regarding California’s pending ‘safe haven’ bill (AB1873), introduced in August, that would extend the time period in which an infant could be legally abandoned from 72 hours to 30 days. In “A Mother’s Choice,” by Jeninne Lee-St.John, published in the Sept. 25 issue of Time Magazine, Pertman points out that research does not indicate that extending the time frame for parents to legally desert their infants does not effectively deal with the problem of unsafe abandonment, but may instead persuade more women to abandon their babies. Pertman comments in a Sept. 15 Sacramento Bee article, “Baby Drop Off Extension Blasted,” by Laura Mecoy, that “mothers choosing legalized abandonment over the adoption process may deprive fathers of their parental rights and adoptive parents and adoptees of the vital health, genealogical and historical information usually collected in the adoption process.” The legislation is awaiting action by Gov.Schwarzenegger. To read the Institute’s August letter urging Gov.Schwarzenegger to veto the bill, go to: http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/old/policy/20060829_letter_safehavencalifletter.php; to read the Adoption Institute's study on this issue, go to: http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/old/whowe/lastreport_coverpage.html. To read the Time article, go to: http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1535837,00.html; to read the Sacramento Bee article, go to: http://www.sacbee.com/111/story/23660.html. To read the proposed bill, go to: http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/pub/bill/asm/ab_1851-1900/ab_1873_bill_20060828_enrolled.html

OPENNESS IN ADOPTION SEEN GROWING, BUT LEGACY OF SECRECY LINGERS
In a Sept. 17 article published on Discovery Health Channel online, “The Adoption Option: How it Works and What to Expect,” by Christina Breda Antoniades, Pertman states that one of the biggest changes in adoption is that more birth and adoptive parents desire a relationship with each other. Open adoptions, in which there is some level of contact among the adoptee, birth and adoptive parents, offers benefits such as access to important family medical information, heritage and history for the adopted child. Pertman was also quoted in another article about the legacy of closed adoptions. “Soldier’s Search to be Continued,” by Waveney Ann Moore, published Sept. 15 in the St. Petersburg Times, is about a U.S. soldier’s efforts to search for his biological parents before being deployed to Iraq; in it, Pertman comments that it is “unfair” that the process is “laborious and lengthy.” To read the Discovery Health article, go to: http://health.discovery.com/centers/baby/adoption/option_print.html; to read the St. Petersburg Times article, go to: http://www.sptimes.com/2006/09/15/Tampabay/Soldier_s_search_to_b.shtml

NEW BOOK INLUDES PERTMAN CHAPTER ON ADOPTION IN THE MEDIA
Executive Director Pertman contributed a chapter, “Adoption in The Media: In Need Of Editing,” in a new book that explores the experience, practice and policy of adoption in the United States. Adoptive Families in a Diverse Society, edited by Katarina Wegar and published by Rutgers University Press in September, contains essays by 21 scholars who provide a broad understanding of adoptive family life and the meaning of diversity and assimilation in American society today. To learn more about the book, go to: http://rutgerspress.rutgers.edu/acatalog/__Adoptive_Families_in_a_Diverse_Society
__2545.html#3637


BRODZINSKY JOINS INSTITUTE, TWO SENIOR STAFF RECEIVE ‘ANGELS’ AWARDS
On Sept. 6 the Adoption Institute announced that Dr. David Brodzinsky – a renowned adoption expert whose research, teaching and writing have made him a luminary in the field for the past three decades – joined the Institute staff as Research and Project Director. Dr. Brodzinsky was a founding board member and a Senior Research Fellow of the Institute prior to joining the staff. In addition, two senior staff members, Program and Project Director Susan Livingston Smith and Research and Policy Director Jeanne Howard, received the prestigious congressional “Angels in Adoption” award in September in recognition of their ground-breaking research in adoption. The awards were presented at a gala dinner on Sept. 20 sponsored annually by the Congressional Coalition on Adoption Institute. To read the press release on Brodzinsky, go to: http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/old/media/20060906_davidbrodzinsky.php; to read about the awards, go to: http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/old/media/20060918_angelsaward.php

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR TO KEYNOTE AT SOUTHERN REGIONAL CONFERENCE
Pertman will present the keynote address, "Welcome to the Revolution: 10 Things Everyone Should Know About Adoption," at the Southern Regional Conference of the American Adoption Congress, “Family Connections: The Evolving Face of Adoption,” on Oct. 28 in Greensboro, N.C. For more information about the conference, go to: http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/old/events/appearances.php#oct; to register, go to: http://www.chsnc.org/a_events/aac_congress/index.html

In addition, Senior Research Fellow Ruth McRoy and Policy and Operations Director Hollee McGinnis are keynote speakers and workshop presenters at St. John’s University’s fourth biennial adoption conference, "Families Without Borders? Adoption Across Culture and Race." The conference runs from Oct. 13-14, 2006, in New York City. For more information on the conference and to register, go to: http://www.stjohns.edu/learnmore/00175

ADOPTION INSTITUTE: GROWING ONWARD AND UPWARD
The Adoption Institute is in the midst of one of the most exciting growth periods in our history. We are about to hire another development staff member in New York and we've just added a Research and Project Director based in California.

We are also planning a series of events across the country, to be held by our loyal supporters and advocates; stay tuned for dates and locations. Most important, we are producing some of the best, cutting-edge work since our founding exactly a decade ago. Here are just a few of the initiatives we are working on:

  • TRANSCULTURAL ADOPTION & IDENTITY With seed funding from the Kellogg Foundation, we are examining factors that contribute to healthy identities for internationally and transculturally adopted people, including best practices and practical recommendations.

  • RIGHTS & WELL-BEING OF BIRTHPARENTS This unprecedented research, which is yet unfunded, will expand the understanding of key policies and practices that are most helpful to birthmothers/fathers during the adoption process and throughout their lives.

  • EXPANDING RESOURCES FOR CHILDREN IN FOSTER CARE This project is designed to increase the pool of adoptive parents for children who need permanent homes - with seed funding from the Gill and David Bohnett foundations.

  • EDUCATE THE EDUCATORS The Institute conducts workshops for teachers and school administrators, as well as presentations at conferences to improve curricula and create a supportive environment for adopted children in schools.

  • EDUCATE THE MEDIA This unique program provides accurate information and up-to-the minute research to journalists across the country, conducts media workshops at conferences nationally, and provides training for reporters and editors.
To find out how you can contribute to the important work of the Institute, go to: http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/old/about/support.php

6. About the Evan D. Donaldson Adoption Institute
Since its establishment in 1996, the Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute has been a pre-eminent, independent voice for improving adoption for everyone it touches - particularly children - through innovative programs, educational initiatives, research and analysis, and advocacy for better practices, policies and laws. Our award-winning web site, www.adoptioninstitute.org/old, is a popular and reliable source for accurate adoption information. Read past e-Newsletters at http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/old/research/enewsletter.php.

SUPPORT OUR WORK
The Adoption Institute was established in 1996 with a one-time grant. To continue our work, we depend on new and renewable sources of funding. We need the financial support of people like you whose lives have been touched by adoption and who care about the future of vulnerable children everywhere.

Please send a generous contribution to the Adoption Institute’s annual fund today. To donate, please call 212-925-4089 or go online to http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/old/about/support.php. Or you can print and complete this form, http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/old/donate/donatereply.pdf, and fax it with your credit card information to 775-796-6592, or mail it with your check or credit card information to:

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