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1. Law, Policy & Practice
- Bill Giving Adult Adoptees Access to Birth Records Progresses in N.Y
- Five New Adoption-Related Measures Introduced in U.S. House
- Tennessee Court Orders Daughter’s Return to Biological Parents
- Class Action Lawsuit Against Nebraska Foster System Dismissed
- Pact Calls for Navajo Children in Foster Care to Stay with Relatives
- Legislation Would Establish National Social Work Research Center

2. Research
- Study Shows Benefit of Intensive Adoption Preservation Services
- Research Finds Positive Outcomes of Independent Living Programs
- Review Identifies Risk, Protective Factors for Foster Disruptions
- Analysis of Transracial Adoption Sees More Delays for Black Children
- Swedish Survey: Most Foster Children Have Good Relations with Sibs
- Author Argues for More Permanency Options for Ghana AIDS Orphans

3. News
- Georgia Reportedly Considers Measure to Expedite Some Adoptions
- Suspects in Bulgarian Baby Smuggling Ring Go on Trial in France
- Advocacy Group Gives Calif. Poor Grade in Care for Foster Children

4. Resources
- Guidebook Offers Expert Information for Adopting from Overseas
- Training Academy Offers Online Course on Multi-Ethnic Placement Act
- National Resource Center Updates State Foster Care Policies
- Family Council’s Book Provides County-Specific Data for N.Y. State
- Federal Guide Focuses on Child and Family Services Improvement Act

5. Institute Update
- Article Reports 'Safe Haven' Laws Have Not Ended Baby Abandonment
- China's New Restrictions will Bar Gays and Lesbians from Adoption
- Hosting Programs for Overseas Orphans Need to be Balanced
- Alleged Kidnapping of Adopted Twins by Birth Mother Called Rare
- Updated Edition of ‘Adoption Nation’ for Institute 10th Anniversary

Law, Policy & Practice

BILL GIVING ADULT ADOPTEES ACCESS TO BIRTH RECORDS PROGRESSES IN N.Y.
Bills that would allow adopted people 18 and older to obtain their original birth certificates and medical histories in New York State, subject to a contact preference filed by birthparents, moved to committee in both chambers of the state legislature. The senate bill (S00235), sponsored by Senator Bill Larkin, was referred to the Health Committee on Jan. 3; the Assembly companion bill (A02277), sponsored by Rep. David Koon, was referred to the Health Committee on Jan. 16. The legislation establishes a “Bill of Adoptee Rights” and allows birthparents to file contact preferences anytime, “but does not limit the right of the adopted person to receive updated health information.” States that currently allow adopted adults to receive a copy of their original birth certificates are Alabama, Alaska, Delaware, Kansas, New Hampshire, Oregon and Tennessee. States considering similar legislation in 2007 include Maine, Missouri, North Carolina and Minnesota. To read the proposed N.Y. measure, go to: http://assembly.state.ny.us/leg/ and search by the bill number.

FIVE NEW ADOPTION-RELATED MEASURES INTRODUCED IN U.S. HOUSE
A handful of bills were introduced in the U.S. House in January; they address international adoption, the adoption tax credit, domestic adoption practices, and infant abandonment:

  • Rep. Jo Ann Davis of Virginia on Jan. 4 introduced the “Intercountry Adoption Reform Act (ICARE) of 2007” (H.R. 120). The measure, which was referred to the Judiciary Committee, would establish an Office of Intercountry Adoption and confer automatic citizenship to adopted children upon entry of a final adoption decree (rather than upon entry into the U.S.). The original ICARE bill was introduced in 2003, and again in April 2006 as an amendment to the controversial 2006 immigration reform bill, “Securing America’s Borders Act” (S.2454), which failed to pass.

  • Rep. David Camp of Mississippi on Jan. 12 introduced the “Adoption Tax Relief Guarantee Act of 2007” (H.R. 471); it was referred to the Committee on Ways and Means. The bill would continue the adoption tax credit and adoption assistance provided by the Economic Growth and Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2001, due to expire in 2010. The Senate last year failed to pass a similar bill making the adoption tax credit permanent.

  • Rep. Philip English of Pennsylvania on Jan.5 introduced the “Religious Freedom for Providers of Adoption, Foster Care, and Child Welfare Services Act” (H.R. 289); it would withhold federal funds for foster care and adoption assistance from states that “restrict the freedom of religious organizations to provide foster care and adoptive services consistent with the fundamental religious beliefs and principles of these organizations.” The measure went to the Committee on Ways and Means.

  • Rep. Jo Ann Davis of Virginia on Jan. 4 also introduced the “Adoption Information Act” (H.R. 104), which would amend Title X of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 300 et seq.). The measure would require any family planning program receiving federal funds to provide clients, in both written and verbal form, a comprehensive list and contact information of local adoption service providers. The bill was referred to the Committee on Energy and Commerce.

  • Rep. Sheila Jackson-Lee of Texas on Jan. 5 introduced the “Baby Abandonment Prevention Act of 2007” (H.R. 259); it would establish a task force within the Bureau of Justice Statistics to collect data and report to Congress on the prevalence, trends, demographics, circumstance, and quality of life outcomes for abandoned infants. The bill was referred to two committees: Judiciary and Education & Labor.

To read any of these proposed measures, go to: http://www.thomas.gov/ and search by bill numbers in the bill number field.

TENNESSEE COURT ORDERS DAUGHTER'S RETURN TO BIOLOGICAL PARENTS
The Tennessee Supreme Court, in a unanimous decision, overturned a 2004 Circuit Court judge’s decision to terminate the parental rights of a Chinese immigrant couple seeking to regain custody of their daughter from her guardians. In its Jan. 23 ruling, the high court said the evidence overwhelmingly showed that the couple had placed their daughter “as a temporary measure to provide health insurance” for her, “with the full intent that custody would be returned.” Due to financial and other problems, the parents had placed their child in foster care shortly after her birth; in 2004, they attempted to regain custody of the girl, then age 5, but the guardians filed to terminate parental rights and adopt the child on the grounds of abandonment by the birthparents. The high court ruling ordered plans for reunification to be made within 12 days; on Jan. 29, the guardians asked the court to stay its order for 30 days, but the court has yet to respond. To read the opinion, go to: http://www.tsc.state.tn.us/; to read a news article on the case, go to: http://www.boston.com/

CLASS ACTION LAWSUIT AGAINST NEBRASKA FOSTER SYSTEM DISMISSED
U.S. District Judge Richard Kopf on Jan. 19 dismissed a class-action lawsuit (Carson v. Heineman) against the Nebraska State Health and Human Services Office on the grounds that federal courts should not intervene with the state court’s authority. The lawsuit alleged that the state’s foster care system was endangering the lives of 6,000 children by not addressing longstanding systematic problems, such as a shortage of foster homes, high caseloads, a lack of mental health services, and a lack of services and resources to encourage adoption. The case was filed in 2005 by Children’s Rights Inc., the Nebraska Appleseed Center for Law in the Public Interest, and several private law firms. The plaintiffs have not decided whether they will appeal. In 2003, Nebraska had one of the nation’s highest rates of out-of-home placements, 13.8 children per 1,000 in care compared with the national average rate of 7.2 children per 1,000. To read the decision, go to: http://www.neappleseed.org/; to read a press release on the judge’s opinion by Nebraska Appleseed Center, go to: http://www.neappleseed.org/; to read a news article about the case, go to:
http://www.nptelegraph.com/

PACT CALLS FOR NAVAJO CHILDREN IN FOSTER CARE TO STAY WITH RELATIVES
An intergovernmental agreement between the Arizona Department of Economic Security and the Navajo Nation will ensure that Navajo children needing foster care will be raised and cared for by relatives. The agreement, signed Dec. 14, 2006, will let the nation be reimbursed hundreds of thousands of dollars for foster care for Navajo children and also provide training and licensing to relatives so they can become caregivers. The agreement is the first a tribe in Arizona has signed with the state; the Navajo Nation has had a similar agreement with New Mexico since Sept. 2002. To read a press release about the agreement from the Navajo Nation, go to: http://www.navajo.org/images/pdf%20releases/George%20Hardeen/dec06/Navajo%20
Nation%20signs/

LEGISLATION WOULD ESTABLISH NATIONAL SOCIAL WORK RESEARCH CENTER
A bill (S. 106) was introduced in the U.S. Senate on Jan. 4 that would establish a national center to support the empirical research of social workers in areas such as family functioning, mental health, and preventive services – and would aid policymakers in understanding complex social issues grounded in such research. The ”National Center for Social Work Research Act,” sponsored by Senator Daniel Inouye of Hawaii, would be funded by federal grants and would promote research, training and fellowships. The bill has been referred to the Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions. To read the proposed legislation, go to: http://www.thomas.gov/ and type S. 106 in the bill search field.

Research

STUDY SHOWS BENEFIT OF INTENSIVE ADOPTION PRESERVATION SERVICES
A study of 99 families receiving intensive in-home services after adoptive placement in Missouri found that at 12 months, service characteristics (number of days, problems addressed) were the greatest predictor of the family’s ability to remain intact; overall, 17 percent disrupted. “The Use of Intensive Family Preservation Services with Adoptive Families,“ by Marianne Berry, Jennifer Propp and Priscilla Martens, appears in the upcoming February issue of Child and Family Social Work (Volume 12, Issue 1). Other factors associated with a higher risk of disruption at the 12-month follow-up were older age of the child and full-time employment of the primary parent. This study provides evidence of the importance of adoption services for stabilizing at-risk placements. To access a free abstract, go to: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/

RESEARCH FINDS POSITIVE OUTCOMES OF INDEPENDENT LIVING PROGRAMS
A review of existing research on independent living programs (ILP) for older youth in foster care concludes they have some benefits, but the quality of the research to date limits our ability to know their effectiveness. ”Independent Living Programs for Young People Leaving the Care System: The State of the Evidence,“ by Paul Montgomery, Charles Donkoh and Kristen Underhill, was published in the December issue of Children and Youth Services Review (Volume 28, Issue 12). For studies reviewed, all but one measuring educational achievement showed better outcomes for ILP youth, and a number of studies reported positive employment outcomes for ILP participants. To access a free abstract, go to: http://www.sciencedirect.com/

REVIEW IDENTIFIES RISK, PROTECTIVE FACTORS FOR FOSTER DISRUPTIONS
A meta-analysis of 26 studies of foster placement breakdown identified behavior problems, older age at placement, a history of residential care, and previous placements as the most significant risk factors for disruption. ”Disruptions in Foster Care: A Review and Meta-Analysis,“ by Mirjam Oosterman, Carlo Schuengel, Wim Slot, Ruud Bullens and Theo Doreleijers, was published in the January issue of Children and Youth Services Review (Volume 29, Issue 1). Some protective factors identified were highly motivated and nurturing foster families and support from relatives or caseworkers. The authors call for more research on the quality of foster care-giving. To access a free abstract, go to: http://www.sciencedirect.com/

ANALYSIS OF TRANSRACIAL ADOPTION SEES MORE DELAYS FOR BLACK CHILDREN
”Transracial Adoption of Black Children: An Economic Analysis,“ by Mary Hansen and Daniel Pollack, analyzes adoption rates of minority children based on AFCARS data, and recommends more aggressive enforcement of MEPA-IEPA laws to remove barriers to transracial adoption. While the number of adoptions of African-American children and transracial adoptions generally have increased, black children continue to experience more delays in adoptive placement than children from other races. The paper also provides a historical analysis of transracial adoption and of anti-discrimination adoption laws. To read the working paper, go to: http://law.bepress.com/

SWEDISH SURVEY: MOST FOSTER CHILDREN HAVE GOOD RELATIONS WITH SIBS
A Swedish study using focus and discussion groups, along with surveys from 684 respondents, examined the impact of fostering on the lives of sons and daughters of foster parents; most respondents rated their relationships with their foster siblings as ”very good“ (41 percent) or rather good (34 percent). ”Sons and Daughters of Foster Carers and the Impact of Fostering on their Everyday Life,“ by Ingrid Hojer, appears in the upcoming February issue of Child and Family Social Work (Volume 12, Issue 1). Even though relations with foster children were generally good, many experienced complications such as difficulty in having a sibling with a very different upbringing, turmoil and conflict in the home, and parents being less available to them. The study suggests practitioners give more attention to siblings’ needs in foster families. To access an abstract, go to:
http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/

AUTHOR ARGUES FOR MORE PERMANENCY OPTIONS FOR GHANA AIDS ORPHANS
A paper, ”Care of Orphans: Fostering Interventions for Children Whose Parents Die of AIDS in Ghana,“ argues that the country must expand its permanency options for orphans and vulnerable children. The paper, written by Alice Ansah-Koi and published in the Oct.-Dec. 2006 issue of Families in Society (Volume 87, Issue 4), focuses on the options to care for Ghana’s 132,000 children orphaned by AIDS, including kinship care, long and short-term foster care, adoption, institutional care, and community-based care. The article analyzes the spread of AIDS in Ghana and examines policy implications for social work practitioners advocating and providing direct services to orphans and their families. To read the full article, go to: http://www.familiesinsociety.org/

 

News

GEORGIA REPORTEDLY CONSIDERS MEASURE TO EXPEDITE SOME ADOPTIONS
The Parliament of the nation of Georgia is considering new legislation that would cut the length of time after which an abandoned child could be eligible for adoption, from three years to a maximum of one year, according to a Jan. 4 article published on the website Institute for War and Peace. ”Georgia: The Adoption Headache,“ reports that 10 to 12 children are found abandoned in the streets each year and that they are in limbo as ”social orphans“ because their parents have abandoned them but have not relinquished parental rights. According to the article, children with physical and mental handicaps are available for adoption more quickly and are predominately adopted by foreigners. According to U.S. Immigration statistics, 14 children from Georgia were legally adopted by Americans in 2005. To read the article, go to: http://www.iwpr.net/

SUSPECTS IN BULGARIAN BABY SMUGGLING RING GO ON TRIAL IN FRANCE
On Jan. 22, 41 adoptive parents, 11 intermediaries, two biological mothers and two individuals suspected of pimping went on trial in Paris for suspected roles in a secret baby trafficking network dating from 2002, according to a report in the International Herald Tribune. ”Adoptive Parents in France Defend System of Buying Babies,“ by Doreen Carvajal, says the ploy involved the trafficking of Bulgarian babies, many thought to have been born to prostitutes, and adopted by France’s Roma (Gypsy) communities. Four individuals suspected of organizing the ring are already jailed and seven others are being sought on international warrants. In late December, authorities in Greece broke up another baby-selling racket, suspected to be run by Albanian and Russian mafias, involving Bulgarian infants who were illegally adopted mostly by Western Europeans and some Americans. According to U.S. immigration statistics, 29 children from Bulgaria were legally adopted by Americans in 2005. To read the International Herald Tribune article, go to: http://www.iht.com/; to read the December article on the Greece situation, go to: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/

ADVOCACY GROUP GIVES CALIF. POOR GRADE IN CARE FOR FOSTER CHILDREN
A new paper by the California advocacy organization Children Now reports on the well-being of the state’s children, offering a grade of D+ for family well-being. ”2006-2007 California Report Card: The State of the State's Children“ reports that while fewer children were involved in the child protective services and foster care than 10 years ago, limited access to health care, inequitable economic resources, and inadequate education have threatened the well-being of families. According to the report, approximately 30 percent of foster care children in California are in relative care; 32 of every 1,000 African American children are in foster care (higher than all other children combined); and 4,300 adolescents ”age out“ of foster care each year. Recommendations include monitoring the implementation of new child welfare and foster care legislation passed in 2006, increasing the number of foster providers, improving recruitment and retention, and allowing foster youth who attend school to remain in the system until age 21. To read the report card, go to: http://publications.childrennow.org/

 

Resources

GUIDEBOOK OFFERS EXPERT INFORMATION FOR ADOPTING FROM OVERSEAS
NTI Upstream, a website with resources for adoption and child welfare professionals and parents, has recently added a booklet, Risk and Promise: A Handbook for Parents Adopting a Child from Overseas. This guide is written by specialists in medicine and developmental psychology – Ira Chasnoff, Linda Schwartz, Cheryl Pratt and Gwendolyn Neuberger. It includes worksheets, developmental status checklists, questions for orphanage staff, and other resources to prepare parents to understand the risk and protective factors affecting their children and to be prepared to address their children’s needs. To access, go to: http://www.ntiupstream.com/

TRAINING ACADEMY OFFERS ONLINE COURSE ON MULTI-ETHNIC PLACEMENT ACT
The Northern California Training Academy is offering a four-credit comprehensive, online course on the Multi-Ethnic Placement Act (MEPA). The course covers topics such as: complying with MEPA; ideas for meeting requirements; how to incorporate MEPA into daily practice; learning agency responses; and developing recruitment plans. The online course will remain open for the duration of two weeks, beginning on January 31, 2007, and ending on February 13. To view the online resource, go to: http://academy.extensiondlc.net/

NATIONAL RESOURCE CENTER UPDATES STATE FOSTER CARE POLICIES
On Jan. 16, the National Resource Center for Family-Centered Practice and Permanency Planning revised the following four documents: Foster Home Licensing, Foster Parent In-Service Training, Foster Parent Pre-Service Training, and Limitations on the Number of Children in a Foster Home. Each has now been modified to include the most up-to-date, state-specific information. To access these publications, go to: http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/

FAMILY COUNCIL'S BOOK PROVIDES COUNTY-SPECIFIC DATA FOR N.Y. STATE
The New York State (NYS) Council on Children and Families released The CHILD in the Child Welfare and the Courts Data Book, which for the first time provides county-specific data on child welfare and child court systems, including the foster care system and child abuse and maltreatment in New York state. The 300-page publication includes demographic statistics; goals and indicators in the areas of education, physical and emotional health, economic security, citizenship, community, and family; regional profiles; a child and family service review; and a glossary. The publication was written by the NYS Permanent Judicial Commission on Justice for Children, with data collected and compiled by the NYS Unified Court System. To access, go to:
http://www.ccf.state.ny.us/

FEDERAL GUIDE FOCUSES ON CHILD AND FAMILY SERVICES IMPROVEMENT ACT
The Administration for Children and Families of the federal Department of Health and Human Services has issued an informational memorandum about the Child and Family Services Improvement Act of 2006 and specific provisions in the law, including the Child Service Welfare Program, the Promoting Safe and Stable Families Act, and the Court Improvement Program. One of the provisions of the act will require all states to establish steps to ensure that 90 percent of children in state care are visited by their caseworkers on a monthly basis by 2011. The resource includes implications of the Title IV-B Amendments on states and tribes. To access, go to: http://www.acf.dhhs.gov/

 

Institute Updates

ARTICLE REPORTS 'SAFE HAVEN' LAWS HAVE NOT ENDED BABY ABANDONMENT
In a Jan. 13 article published in the New York Times, ”Safe-Haven Laws Fail to End Discarding of Babies,“ by Cara Buckley, Executive Director Pertman states that these laws can do more harm than good – for instance, by depriving the affected children of their biological and medical information.

On Jan. 21, the Adoption Institute submitted written testimony to Nebraska state Senator Brad Ashford and the state Senate Judiciary Committee urging them to reject the proposed Nebraska Safe Havens Act (LB6). The Institute letter states that while the legislation is well-intentioned, the research indicates it would not save infants' lives but instead would ”increase the number of anonymously deserted children, systemically strip biological fathers of their rights, cause lifelong grief to growing numbers of birthmothers, divest adoptive parents of vital information with which to raise their children, and institutionally deprive additional adoptees of their medical, genealogical and historical information.“

To read the New York Times article for a fee, go to: http://www.nytimes.com/; to read the Institute’s letter to Nebraska legislators, go to: http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/old/policy/; to read the Institute's report on this issue, entitled ”Unintended Consequences“, go to: http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/old/whowe/

CHINA'S NEW RESTRICTIONS WILL BAR GAYS AND LESBIANS FROM ADOPTION
In a Jan. 5 article published in the Southern Voice, ”Gay America No Longer Able to Adopt from China,“ by Ryan Lee, Executive Director Adam Pertman discusses the decision of Chinese officials to bar single parents from adopting from that nation – closing a loophole that had permitted some gay or lesbian couples to adopt. Adoption Institute Executive Director Adam Pertman suggested the change in policy provides an opportunity for domestic adoption agencies to educate Chinese officials about the research and experience showing gay and lesbian parents can provide good homes for children. To read the article, go to: http://www.sovo.com/

HOSTING PROGRAMS FOR OVERSEAS ORPHANS NEED TO BE BALANCED
In a Jan. 13 article in the New York Times, ”A Taste of U.S. Family Life, but Adoption in Limbo,“ by Jane Gross, Pertman states that hosting programs – typically involving children living in orphanages from former Soviet bloc countries – would not be necessary in an ideal world. Pertman also says the challenge for U.S. agencies who sponsor such programs for orphans is in balancing the optimism of a possible adoption with the legal and political barriers that can make such adoptions difficult. To read the article for a fee, go to: http://www.nytimes.com/

ALLEGED KIDNAPPING OF ADOPTED TWINS BY BIRTH MOTHER CALLED RARE
Pertman stated in a Dec. 31 International Herald Tribune article that it is rare for birthparents to try to take their children once they have been relinquished for adoption; that rarity, he said, is why the alleged kidnapping by a Florida woman – who was in the process of contesting the adoption of her twin toddlers – drew so much media attention. In the article, ”Mother Accused of Kidnapping Biological Twins had ‘Given Up’,“ Pertman also states, ”There was no evidence that she was going to hurt the kids, there was evidence that she wanted to parent the kids.“ To read the article, go to:
http://www.iht.com/; to read the Adoption Institute study on the rights and well-being of birthparents, go to: http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/old/research/

UPDATED EDITION OF 'ADOPTION NATION' FOR INSTITUTE 10TH ANNIVERSARY
The Adoption Institute is proud to announce a new, updated "Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute Special Edition" of Executive Director Adam Pertman's ground-breaking book, Adoption Nation: How the Adoption Revolution is Transforming America. The new edition is dedicated to the Institute on the occasion of its 10th anniversary, and all profits from its sale will be donated to the Institute. To order online, go to:
http://www.amazon.com/; to order multiple signed copies, write to info@adoptioninsitute.org; to order multiple signed copies, write to info@adoptioninsitute.org; for more information or to arrange an interview with Pertman, read the press release at:
http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/old/media/200610_pertmanebdaiedition.php

Among Pertman's appearances in coming months are as a commentator at the Third Annual Wells Conference on Adoption Law, sponsored by the National Center for Adoption Law and Policy, on Feb. 15 in Columbus, Ohio; and as a speaker – along with several other members of the Adoption Institute policy staff – at the American Adoption Congress conference in Massachusetts in early March. For more information about either event, please email info@adoptioninstitute.org or call 617-332-8944. For more information about appearances by members of the Adoption Institute staff, go to: http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/old/events/appearances.php

Among the major events the Institute is planning for the coming year is a national conference on Ethics in Adoption, which will sponsored with the adoption reform organization Ethica. The conference will be held in suburban Washington, D.C., on Oct. 15-16, 2007. The Institute held its landmark first ethics conference in 1999, and this one – like its predecessor – promises to have significant impact on the field.

Our annual "Taste of Spring" gala will be held in New York on May 17; please save the date and contact us if you have questions, want to reserve tickets (they go quickly) or are interested in an individual or corporate sponsorship. We are planning additional fund-raising events across the country during the coming months and year, to be held by our loyal supporters and advocates who want to ensure that we can continue doing our unique, important work; stay tuned for dates and locations. Most important, we are producing some of the best, highest-impact initiatives since our founding a decade ago. 

Here are just a few of the initiatives we are working on:

  • TRANSCULTURAL ADOPTION & IDENTITY

  • RIGHTS & WELL-BEING OF BIRTHPARENTS

  • EXPANDING RESOURCES FOR CHILDREN IN FOSTER CARE

  • ADOPTION AGENCY PRACTICES WITH GAYS AND LESBIANS

  • ADOPTIVE PARENT PREPARATION PROJECT

  • RESTORING RIGHTS TO ACCESS BIRTH RECORDS

  • SAFE HAVENS: ARE THE LAWS WORKING?

  • EDUCATE THE EDUCATORS AND EDUCATE THE MEDIA PROGRAMS

To find out how you can contribute to the important work of the Institute, go to: http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/old/about/support.php

 

ABOUT THE EVAN B. DONALDSON ADOPTION INSTITUTE

Since its establishment in 1996, the Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute has been a pre-eminent, independent voice for improving adoption for everyone it touches - particularly children - through innovative programs, educational initiatives, research and analysis, and advocacy for better practices, policies and laws. Our award-winning web site, www.adoptioninstitute.org/old, is a popular and reliable source for accurate adoption information.


Support Our Work

The Adoption Institute was established in 1996 with a one-time grant. To continue our work, we depend on new and renewable sources of funding. We need the financial support of people like you whose lives have been touched by adoption and who care about the future of vulnerable children everywhere. Please send a generous contribution to the Adoption Institute’s annual fund today. To donate, please call 212-925-4089 or go online to:
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Or you can print and complete this form,
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