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1. Law, Policy & Practice
- Legislation Would Create U.S. Office for Orphan Policy Diplomacy
- Bill Seeks To Cut Unintended Pregnancies, Educate Public on Adoption
- Virginia Permits 'Cooperative Adoption' Agreements from Foster Care
- Missouri Establishes Foster Placement Preference for Grandparents
- D.C. Expands Law on Parenthood for Gay/Straight Partners

2. Research
- West VA Study Indicates ICPC Delays Largely Beyond Agencies’ Control
- Guatemalan Foster Parents Reveal Mixed Views Relating To Adoption
- Studies Show Negative Impact of Deprivation, Abuse On Adoptees
- Lesbians Seen More Likely To Adopt Black Children from Foster Care

3. News
- Recession Causes Drop in Employers Offering Adoption Benefits
- Adoptees, Birthparents Advocate for Access to Birth Certificates
- China Investigating Allegations of Infants Taken For Adoption
- South Korea Reportedly Falling Short for Searching Adoptees
- Number of Adoptees Returned to Care Increases in United Kingdom

4. Resources
- Campaign Targets High Rate of Pregnancies Among Foster Youth
- Annie E. Casey Foundation Releases 2009 Kids Count Data Book
- World Vision Reports on Illegal Adoption and Child Trafficking
- Voice for Adoption Issues Brief Stressing Post-Adoption Services
- Survey Highlights Model Programs for Youth Aging Out Of Care

5. Institute Update
- Child Welfare League of America and Institute Announce Partnership
- Pertman Urges Consideration of Causes Of Unsafe Abandonment
- Institute Report Informs Discussion of Reproductive Technology
- Institute Suggests Countering Film’s Negative Depiction of Adoption
- Institute Staffer Brodzinsky Comments on Same-Sex Parentage Case
- West-Coast Supporters, Save the Date: Institute L.A. Benefit Is Nov. 10

Law, Policy & Practice

LEGISLATION WOULD CREATE U.S. OFFICE FOR ORPHAN POLICY DIPLOMACY
On July 16, Sen. Mary Landrieu (D-LA) and Sen. James Inhofe (R-OK) introduced the Families for Orphans Act of 2009 (S1458) "to encourage the development and implementation of a comprehensive, global strategy for the preservation and reunification of families and the provision of permanent parental care for orphans." The Act, which was referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations, would establish an Office for Orphan Policy Diplomacy and Development within the Department of State. The bill sets "minimum standards for the provision of permanent parental care" and eligibility criteria for financial assistance to countries, while authorizing assistance to countries to enable them to meet the standards or to countries that already meet the standards. The legislation also requires the State Department to initiate a study to identify global best practices for family preservation and permanent parental care. Rep. Diane Watson (D-CA) and Rep. John Boozman (R-AR) introduced a related bill (HR3070) in the House on June 26 that was referred to the Committee on Foreign Affairs. To read S1458, go to: http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=111_cong_bills&docid=f:s1458is.txt.pdf; to read HR3070, go to: http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=111_cong_bills&docid=f:h3070ih.txt.pdf.

BILL SEEKS TO CUT UNINTENDED PREGNANCIES, EDUCATE PUBLIC ON ADOPTION
Rep. Tim Ryan (D-OH) introduced the Preventing Unintended Pregnancies, Reducing the Need for Abortion, and Supporting Parents Act (HR3312) on July 23. Among its provisions are grants for a national information campaign to educate the public by "promot[ing] accurate positive information and messages on adoption, including foster care adoption" and an expansion of the adoption tax credit from $10,000 to $15,000. The bill also seeks to reduce teen pregnancies and expand maternal and reproductive health coverage for low-income women, while supporting pregnant women and new parents through expanded health programs. The legislation has 12 cosponsors and was referred to multiple committees; there appears to be no companion bill in the Senate. To read the bill, go to: http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=111_cong_bills&docid=f:h3312ih.txt.pdf.

VIRGINIA PERMITS 'COOPERATIVE ADOPTION' AGREEMENTS FROM FOSTER CARE
A new Virginia state law (Chapter 260) took effect on July 1 that allows a foster child's birthparent(s) and pre-adoptive parent(s) to enter into a written post-adoption contact and communication agreement. The court may approve an agreement if it finds that it is in the child's best interests, both sets of parents have consented, the agency and guardian ad litem recommend approval and, if the child is 14 years or older, he/she has consented. The law provides birthparents the right to seek to enforce these "cooperative adoption" agreements. In an opinion article in the Newport News Daily Press on July 12, "New law allows cooperative adoptions," the bill's sponsor, state Sen. John Miller (D-1st), explained that he was motivated partly by the fact that "Virginia leads the nation with the highest percentage [20%] of foster children to age out of the system without having found a permanent family." To read the Act, go to: http://leg1.state.va.us/cgi-bin/legp504.exe?091+ful+CHAP0260; to read the article, go to: http://www.dailypress.com/news/opinion/dp-op_miller_0712jul12,0,2982593.story.

MISSOURI ESTABLISHES FOSTER PLACEMENT PREFERENCE FOR GRANDPARENTS
Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon signed legislation (HB154) into law July 8 that requires the state to make diligent efforts to place a child with a grandparent for emergency and foster placements. The law also requires each school district to establish an educational liaison for children in foster care to facilitate school placement and record requests. A July 10 article in the Neosho Daily News by Amye Buckley, "Rep's bill signed into law," reports that the sponsor was spurred to introduce the legislation because "'once the child got into the system it was very, very hard then for the grandparent to go back and become involved and also very expensive.'" To read the law, go to: http://www.house.mo.gov/billtracking/bills091/biltxt/truly/HB0154T.HTM; to read the article, go to: http://www.neoshodailynews.com/news/x488834370/Rep-s-bill-signed-into-law.

D.C. EXPANDS LAW ON PARENTHOOD FOR GAY/STRAIGHT PARTNERS
An apparently ground-breaking law went into effect on July 18 in Washington, D.C., that allows the consenting spouse or unmarried partner of a woman who gives birth through artificial insemination to be the child's legal parent, and to be listed as such on the birth certificate. The Domestic Partnership Judicial Determination of Parentage Amendment Act of 2009 (A18-0084) also states that the partner in a registered domestic partnership – straight or gay – is the presumed parent when his/her partner gives birth. According to a press release from the National Center for Lesbian Rights, "the District has become the first jurisdiction in the country to enact a statute specifically providing children born through artificial insemination with two legal parents from the beginning even when those parents are a same-sex or different-sex unmarried couple." To read the law, go to: http://www.dccouncil.washington.dc.us/images/00001/20090511122621.pdf; to read the press release, go to: http://www.nclrights.org/site/PageServer?pagename=press_DCparentingbill072209; to read the Institute’s reports on adoption by gays and lesbians, go to: http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/old/publications/#gaylesbianadoption; to read the Institute’s report on adoption’s lessons for assisted reproductive technology (ART), go to: http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/old/publications/2009_02_OldLessons.pdf.

Research

WEST VA STUDY INDICATES ICPC DELAYS LARGELY BEYOND AGENCY CONTROL
"Delayed Placement: An Analysis of the Interstate Compact for the Placement of Children in West Virginia," by Corey Colyer, analyzed case activity on 219 referrals to the state’s ICPC office, finding that only 38 percent achieved the 60-day standard for timely completion. In the vast majority of cases, delays were due to conditions beyond the agency's control, such as parents’ compliance with procedures and delays in state or federal background checks. This article, published in the July issue of Children and Youth Services Review (Volume 31, Issue 7), found that delays were most common in foster or temporary care situations, which took an average 93-105 days to complete. The highest rate of delays due to circumstances within the agency's control ("staffing/workload bottlenecks") was in public agency adoptions – cited in 24 percent of cases. To access an abstract, go to: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6V98-4VMGTY0-1&_user=10&_coverDate=07%2F31%2F2009&_rdoc=9&_fmt=high&_orig=browse&_srch=doc-info%28%23toc%235892%232009%23999689992%231122051%23FLA%23display%23Volume%29&_cdi=5892&_sort=d&_docanchor=&_ct=15&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=7a2c787212b36448ff2167cb89c75bf8.

GUATEMALAN FOSTER PARENTS REVEAL MIXED VIEWS RELATING TO ADOPTION
A qualitative study based on interviews with 16 Guatemalan foster parents, who had cared for more than 160 children, explored their views about the adoption process. While most expressed positive attitudes about adoption, 63 percent viewed birthmothers as having been recruited by "Jaladoras" (finders of babies) and poverty as the primary reason for the birthmothers' decisions. "Foster Parents as a Critical Link and Resource in International Adoptions from Guatemala," by Judith Gibbons, Samantha Wilson and Alicia Schnell, was published in the current issue of Adoption Quarterly (Volume 12, Issue 2). Those interviewed also reported being stigmatized for being a foster parent and recommended more supports for domestic adoption. Most also made negative comments about birthparents, describing them as having deceived their families about their adoption decisions. To access an abstract, go to: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all~content=a912432771; to read the Institute’s report on birthparents in the United States, go to: http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/old/publications/2006BirthparentStudyrevised07.pdf.

STUDIES SHOW NEGATIVE IMPACT OF DEPRIVATION, ABUSE ON ADOPTEES
A pilot study investigating the impact of early deprivation on brain development through the use of MRIs found Romanian adoptees had significant differences in their brain structures compared to non-adopted adolescents. The primary difference was in the amygdala, which plays a role in basic emotional processing and guiding social behaviors. "Amygdala, Hippocampal and Corpus Callosum Size following Severe Early Institutional Deprivation: The English and Romanian Adoptees Study Pilot," by Mitul Mehta, Nicole Golembo, Chiara Nosarti, Emma Colvert, Ashley Mota, Steven William, Michael Rutter and Edmund Sonuga-Barke, will be published in the August issue of the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry (Volume 50, Issue 8). Children with longer periods of institutionalization had smaller left amygdala volumes, supporting the researchers’ conclusion that early deprivation harms brain development. To access an abstract, go to: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/122328841/abstract.

A longitudinal study following over 600 international adoptees for 20 years found that severe abuse or neglect adversely affects neuroendocrine functioning. "Early Neglect and Abuse Predict Diurnal Cortisol Patterns in Adults: A Study of International Adoptees," by Esther van der vegt, Jan van der Ende, Clemens Kirschbaum, Frank Verhulst and Henning Tiemeier, was published in the May issue of Psychoneuroendocrinology (Volume 34, Issue 5). The study found cortisol levels were lower in adoptees who experienced severe neglect or abuse before being adopted, and higher levels in those experiencing moderate maltreatment. (Cortisol is a stress hormone secreted by the adrenal glands; abnormally high levels in childhood are thought to lead to very low levels of cortisol in adults). To access an abstract, go to: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6TBX-4V9RHW3-1&_user=10&_coverDate=06%2F30%2F2009&_rdoc=4&_fmt=high&_orig=browse&_srch=doc-info%28%23toc%235154%232009%23999659994%231040088%23FLA%23display%23Volume%29&_cdi=5154&_sort=d&_docanchor=&_ct=20&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=56b77340988d0e4f53ec6ac97d63e454.

LESBIANS SEEN MORE LIKELY TO ADOPT BLACK CHILDREN FROM FOSTER CARE
Researchers investigated the factors predicting openness to adopting an African American child among couples seeking to adopt their first child. Significant factors included younger age, being White (rather than a non-Black minority), being lesbian rather than heterosexual, pursuing public vs. private domestic adoption, and perceiving their neighborhood as diverse. "Predicting Non-African American Lesbian and Heterosexual Preadoptive Couples' Openness to Adopting an African American Child," by Abbie Goldberg and Julianna Smith, was published in the July issue of Family Relations (Volume 58, Issue 3). Other findings included that lesbians: were more likely to pursue public adoption, perceived less support from their social networks for adopting, and lived in more diverse neighborhoods than did heterosexual adopters. To access an abstract, go to: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/122463798/abstract

 

News

RECESSION CAUSES DROP IN EMPLOYERS OFFERING ADOPTION BENEFITS
A July 16 Wall Street Journal article by Sue Shellenbarger, "Targeting 'Feel-Good' Benefits," reports that the number of employers offering adoption assistance had fallen from a high of 22 percent in 2006 to 10 percent in 2009, according to a Society for Human Resource Management survey. Rita Soronen, Executive Director of the Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption, is quoted as saying that reimbursements and paid leave "can be 'a critical piece in families' making a decision to move forward.'" The article notes that despite the recession, a few companies are starting to include adoption assistance among their employee benefits. Hewitt Associates finds that only 0.1 percent of employees take advantage of such benefits annually, so they are not typically expensive to implement. To read the article, go to: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970203577304574274041938307248.html?mod=googlenews_wsj.

ADOPTEES, BIRTHPARENTS ADVOCATE FOR ACCESS TO BIRTH CERTIFICATES
According to a July 22 article in the Philadelphia Inquirer, "Adoptees protest for access to original birth certificates," about 120 adoptees and birthparents protested outside the National Conference of State Legislatures annual meeting in Philadelphia. They advocated for state law changes to restore the right of adult adoptees to gain access to their original birth certificates. The article, by Jeff Gammage, notes that opponents to such access – such as the National Council for Adoption and state chapters of Planned Parenthood and the ACLU – were not present. To read the article, go to: http://www.philly.com/inquirer/local/20090722_Adoptees_protest_for_access_to_original_birth_certificates.html. To read the Institute's report on the issue, go to: http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/old/publications/2007_11_For_Records.pdf.

CHINA INVESTIGATING ALLEGATIONS OF INFANTS TAKEN FOR ADOPTION
According to a July 3 Wall Street Journal article, "China Checks Out Charges Babies Taken From Home," the Chinese government is investigating allegations that officials took babies from families violating family planning laws during 2003-2005 in a southern Chinese county and placed them in orphanages for international adoption. A July 2 BBC story, "China babies 'sold for adoption'" reports that a state-owned news agency discovered that "about 80 girls in one county had been sold for $3,000," with local officials and orphanages sharing in the adoption fees. To read the articles, go to: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124656106407087613.html and http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/8130900.stm.

SOUTH KOREA REPORTEDLY FALLING SHORT FOR SEARCHING ADOPTEES
A July 17 opinion piece by Jennifer Kwon Dobbs and Jane Jeong Trenka asserts that South Korea's Central Adoption Information Service Center, its version of a Central Authority to comply with the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption, falls short in its provision of services to adoptees searching for their birth families. One reason is because its website is in Korean. According to "Korea Continues to Deny Overseas Adoptees Access," the Ministry of Health, Welfare and Family states that 78,000 adoptees went to South Korea to search for their birth families from 1995-2005, but only 2.7 percent were reunited. The article reports that the Ministry may hold another public hearing to solicit adoptee and birthmother concerns before submitting adoption law recommendations to the National Assembly. To read the opinion piece, go to: http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/opinon/2009/07/137_48629.html.

NUMBER OF ADOPTEES RETURNED TO CARE INCREASES IN UNITED KINGDOM
According to a July 10 article in The Times by Rosemary Bennett, a survey of local authorities in England, Scotland and Wales revealed that the number of children returning to care from adoptive families increased from 26 in 2004-2005, to 57 in 2008-2009. The article, "Number of adopted children returned to care has doubled in five years," reports that extrapolating from the survey group means that a total of 250 children re-entered care. At the same time, the total number of adoptions has decreased to 4,637 in 2007, the smallest number since 1999; over 75 percent of children who are adopted were removed from their homes due to abuse or neglect. A charity, Adoption UK, notes that the statistics underscore the "lack of support for adoptive families." To read the article, go to: http://women.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/women/families/article6675966.ece.

 

Resources

CAMPAIGN TARGETS HIGH RATE OF PREGNANCIES AMONG FOSTER YOUTH
The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy issued a brief in July on pregnancy prevention for youth in foster care, "Opportunities to Help Youth in Foster Care: Addressing Pregnancy Prevention in the Implementation of the Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008." Among statistics reported are that by age 17, 33 percent of girls in foster care have been pregnant at least once, increasing to 48 percent by age 19 and 71 percent by age 21. Opportunities to address this problem with foster youth and those aging out of care in the Fostering Connections Act of 2008 are highlighted. To download the brief, go to: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org/resources/pdf/Briefly_Youth_Foster_Care.pdf.

ANNIE E. CASEY FOUNDATION RELEASES 2009 KIDS COUNT DATA BOOK
On July 28, the Annie E. Casey Foundation released its 2009 KIDS COUNT Data Book – "Counting What Counts: Taking Results Seriously for Vulnerable Children and Families." This is the 20th annual volume in this series, and it provides state-based data on 10 indicators of child well-being. Based on these measures, the report ranks all 50 states in relation to child well-being, with New Hampshire, Minnesota and Utah leading the roster. To access the report, go to: http://datacenter.kidscount.org/databook/.

WORLD VISION REPORTS ON ILLEGAL ADOPTION AND CHILD TRAFFICKING
World Vision has issued a report, "10 Things You Need to Know about Human Trafficking," which highlights a link between illegal adoptions – which circumvent systems that are set up to protect children’s rights in adoption – and conditions that contribute to child trafficking. Cases in several countries in which traffickers buy and sell babies for adoption are reported, and recommendations for promoting ethical adoption are suggested. These include promoting universal birth registration, ensuring full transparency of birthparents' permission, assessing compliance with Hague protocols, and improving monitoring of transit homes and orphanages. To access the report, go to: http://www.worldvision.org.uk/upload/pdf/10Things.pdf.

VOICE FOR ADOPTION ISSUES BRIEF STRESSING POST-ADOPTION SERVICES
In conjunction with a July legislative briefing on the need for post-adoption services, the umbrella organization Voice for Adoption released a six-page paper highlighting the need for such services and making the following recommendations: 1) enhance federal funding; 2) promote the development of adoption-competent services through training mental health providers; 3) increase outcome-based research on post-adoption service models; and 4) provide federal encouragement to states to re-invest Adoption Incentive funds in these services, as well as increase Adoption Opportunities funding. To access the brief, go to: http://voice-for-adoption.org/downloads/VFA%20post-adopt%20paper%20FINAL%207.9.09.pdf.

SURVEY HIGHLIGHTS MODEL PROGRAMS FOR YOUTH AGING OUT OF CARE
The National Association of Public Child Welfare Administrators' (NAPCWA) website has added results of a workgroup survey on states' services for youth in and aging out of foster care. Model programs and practices in 10 areas are described, including services related to housing, education, transition to adult programs, family/permanency connections, and others. To access survey results, go to: http://www.napcwa.org/Youth/practice_areas.asp.

 

Institute Updates

CHILD WELFARE LEAGUE OF AMERICA AND INSTITUTE ANNOUNCE PARTNERSHIP
On July 8, the Child Welfare League of America and the Adoption Institute announced "a strategic partnership to enhance the efficacy of their current work, to forge important new projects together, and to increase the overall impact of two of the nation's leading organizations dedicated to helping children and families." Areas of collaboration include: an initiative to increase the number of children, especially those of color, adopted from foster care and a major White House Conference on Children and Youth in 2010. To read the press release, go to: http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/old/media/20090708_press_cwla.php.

PERTMAN URGES CONSIDERATION OF CAUSES OF UNSAFE ABANDONMENT
In a July 1 article by Dave Hendricks, "Abandoned newborn handed over to foster parents" in the Columbus Dispatch, Institute Executive Director Adam Pertman asserts that "If we were able to address (the parents') problems, we wouldn't be saving babies, because they wouldn't be abandoning them." He added that "Parental counseling and training to help social workers, teachers and clergy members determine whether a woman is trying to hide a pregnancy – and how to help her – would be a better solution." The article reports that 52 children have been abandoned under Ohio’s "safe haven" law, while the state does not record unsafe abandonments. Ohio allocated $2,000 to advertise the law in 2009. To read the article, go to: http://www.columbusdispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2009/06/30/haven.html?sid=101; to read the Institute’s report on the issue, go to: http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/old/whowe/Last%20report.pdf.

INSTITUTE REPORT INFORMS DISCUSSION OF REPRODUCTIVE TECHNOLOGY
The Adoption Institute's recent report, "Old Lessons for a New World," which recommends that many of adoption's best practices be applied to assisted reproductive technology (ART), is cited in a July 16 ABC news article by Susan Donaldson James. According to "Old Mom: Dies at 69, Leaves Orphan Twins," some prospective parents are turning to international adoption and ART to circumvent age limits designed to protect the best interests of the child in adoption. Institute Executive Director Pertman states, "We should be thinking of the ethical issues and not just do it because we medically know how." To read the article, go to: http://abcnews.go.com/Health/ReproductiveHealth/Story?id=8098755&page=1; to read the Institute’s report, go to: http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/old/publications/2009_02_OldLessons.pdf.

INSTITUTE SUGGESTS COUNTERING FILM’S NEGATIVE DEPICTION OF ADOPTION
According to a July 17 MSNBC article, "Adoption groups decry film with evil orphan," 11 adoption and child welfare groups have requested a meeting with Warner Bros. concerning the horror film, "Orphan," which opened July 24. In response to criticism, Warner Bros. revised the movie's trailer and may add a "pro-adoption message" at the film's conclusion in DVD form. Institute Executive Director Pertman recommends that the studio produce educational materials about adoption's realities – which "Orphan" depicts negatively – noting, "It has been a long time since a movie caused this much angst and worry in the adoption, foster care and orphan care communities, even before its release." To read the article, go to: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/31966443/ns/entertainment-movies/; to read the Institute’s press release on this film, go to: http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/old/media/20090528_press_orphanmovie.php.

INSTITUTE STAFFER BRODZINSKY COMMENTS ON SAME-SEX PARENTAGE CASE
A July 26 New York Times Magazine article considers the background and implications of the West Virginia Supreme Court case decided last month that stopped the removal of a foster child from a same-sex couple’s home. "The Battle Over a Baby," by Pamela Paul, quotes David Brodzinsky, Ph.D, as saying that "'Children begin to show measurable signs of attachment by 6 months of age.'" Brodzinsky, who is the Adoption Institute's Research & Project Director, added that to take an 11-month-old child from the couple who had parented her nearly since birth "makes no sense whatsoever from a psychological perspective." The article also references the Institute's 2003 study of adoption agency attitudes toward gay and lesbian prospective adopters, noting that "only 60 percent accepted applications from gays." To read the article, go to: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/26/magazine/26lesbian-t.html?_r=1&hpw; to read the Institute’s study, go to: http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/old/whowe/Gay%20and%20Lesbian%20Adoption1.html; to read the Institute’s other reports on gay/lesbian adoption, go to: http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/old/publications/#gaylesbianadoption.

WEST-COAST SUPPORTERS, SAVE THE DATE: INSTITUTE L.A. BENEFIT IS NOV. 10
Those of you who live in Southern California – or plan to travel there! – please mark Nov. 10, 2009 on your calendars for the next Adoption Institute Benefit in Los Angeles. This is always a fun party, full of movie and television stars, and movers and shakers in the entertainment industry, all devoted to supporting the work of the Institute to make adoption fairer and more beneficial for everyone it touches. The event will be at a private home, so please contact Laura James at ljames@adoptioninstitute.org or 212-925-4089 for information on sponsorship opportunities and on how to attend.

If you are interested in hosting an event in your area, please contact Laura James at ljames@adoptioninstitute.org. And if parties are not "your thing," we welcome direct support of our work! Some of our current projects available for support include:

•    RIGHTS & WELL-BEING OF BIRTHPARENTS
•    EXPANDING RESOURCES FOR CHILDREN IN FOSTER CARE
•    IMPROVING ADOPTION AGENCY PRACTICES WITH GAYS AND LESBIANS
•    RESTORING RIGHTS TO ACCESS BIRTH RECORDS
•    ADOPTION IN THE SCHOOLS AND ADOPTION IN THE MEDIA PROGRAMS

To find out more about contributing to the important work of the Institute, go to: http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/old/about/support.php

 

About the Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute

Since its establishment in 1996, the Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute has been a pre-eminent, independent voice for improving adoption for everyone it touches - particularly children - through innovative programs, educational initiatives, research and analysis, and advocacy for better practices, policies and laws. Our award-winning web site, www.adoptioninstitute.org/old, is a popular and reliable source for accurate adoption information.


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The Adoption Institute was established in 1996 with a one-time grant. To continue our work, we depend on new and renewable sources of funding. We need the financial support of people like you whose lives have been touched by adoption and who care about the future of vulnerable children everywhere. Please send a generous contribution to the Adoption Institute’s annual fund today. To donate, please call 212-925-4089 or go online to: http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/old/about/support.php, or print and complete this form http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/old/donate/donatereply.pdf, and fax it to 775-796-6592, or mail it with your check or credit card information to:

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