If you cannot access the message below, view the Web version at http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/old.


EDITOR'S NOTE: The December and January issues of the Institute newsletter will be combined and will be published on January 31, 2012.

1. Law, Policy & Practice
- U.S. Reports Number of International Adoptions Continues to Decline
- Obama, Marking Adoption Month, Focuses on 'All Qualified Caregivers'
- Two Bills Target Bias Based on Sexual Orientation, Immigration Status
- Congressional Coalition Institute Project Recommends Best Practices
- Report Finds Numerous IRS Audits of Filings for Adoption Tax Credit
- Vietnam to Put Hague Convention into Effect in February 2012

2. Research
- First-of-It's Kind Analysis Finds Benefits in Early Parenting, Adoption
- Project Shows Better Outcomes in Foster over Institutional Care
- Canadian Research: Most Chinese Adoptees Form Secure Attachments
- Same-Sex Couples in Small Towns Say They Face Barriers to Adoption
- Irish Foster Adoption Study Explores Challenges Related to Contact

3. News
- IL Dioceses Drop Suit on Retaining Catholic Charities' Foster Services
- Disparities Exposed in SD Child Welfare for Native American Children
- Article Explores Reasons for Large Number of Russian 'Orphans'

4. Resources
- AdoptUSKids Webinar Highlights Resources to Increase Adoptions
- Rudd Program Posts 2011 Dozier Keynote on Attachment and Behavior
- Report Examines Brain Research Implications for Youth Exiting Care
- Guidelines on Work with Birthparents in Rights' Termination Cases

5. From Our Partners
- Adoption Quarterly: Infant-Adopted Girls Have More Issues than Boys
- Adoption Today: New Issue Looks at Holiday Celebrations… and More
- Adoption Learning Partners: New Course on Caring for Children's Hair

6. Institute Update
- President Clinton Praises Institute's Work and Urges Support For It
- Martha Henry Joins Staff in New Position of Education Director
- Include the Institute in Tax Planning, Year-End Giving – and as a Gift
- Learn About Our Work and Accomplishments in 2011 Annual Report
- In the Media: Highlights of Our Work, Pertman Interviews, Commentary
- Upcoming Staff Appearances

 

Law, Policy & Practice

U.S. REPORTS NUMBER OF INTERNATIONAL ADOPTIONS CONTINUES TO DECLINE
The State Department posted its FY 2011 Annual Report on Intercountry Adoption on Nov. 16, reporting 9,320 international adoptions to the United States in 2011, compared to 11,058 adoptions in 2010 and down from a high of 22,991 in 2004. The largest sending countries were China, Ethiopia and Russia. The report also includes average number of days to completion and median provider fees by countries that have ratified the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption. To read the report, go to: http://1.usa.gov/vmvnYr; for statistics from prior years, go to: http://1.usa.gov/vjtZxr.

OBAMA, MARKING ADOPTION MONTH, FOCUSES ON 'ALL QUALIFIED CAREGIVERS'
President Barack Obama issued a proclamation on Nov. 1 to mark National Adoption Awareness Month 2011, in which he stressed that every kind of qualified parent should be considered for children in foster care. "With so many children waiting for loving homes, it is important to ensure that all qualified caregivers are given the opportunity to serve as adoptive parents, regardless of race, religion, sexual orientation, or marital status," Obama said in the Presidential Proclamation. He also called on Americans to ensure that "every child is given the sustaining love of family, the assurance of a permanent home, and the supportive upbringing they deserve." Also for National Adoption Month, Adoption Institute Executive Director Adam Pertman was a special presenter on Nov. 28 at a White House event sponsored by the Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships. To read the Presidential Proclamation, go to: http://1.usa.gov/umP4fP. The Department of Health & Human Services' Child Welfare Information Gateway offers National Adoption Month resources at http://1.usa.gov/tLLBnf. Ambassador Susan Jacobs, the State Department's Special Advisor for Children's Issues, spoke about intercountry adoptions for National Adoption Month; to view her talk, go to: http://1.usa.gov/vBWiQX.

TWO BILLS TARGET BIAS BASED ON SEXUAL ORIENTATION, IMMIGRATION STATUS
Sen. Gillibrand (D-NY) on Nov. 1 introduced the Every Child Deserves a Family Act (S1770) "to prohibit discrimination in adoption or foster care placements based on the sexual orientation, gender identity, or marital status of any prospective adoptive or foster parent, or the sexual orientation or gender identity of the child involved." With eight cosponsors, it was referred to the Committee on Finance. Rep. Stark (D-CA) – already the chief sponsor of the same bill as Sen. Gillibrand's in the House – on Nov. 3 introduced the Foster Children Opportunity Act (HR3333), which would require states to help children in the foster care system without lawful immigration status to apply for all available forms of relief under immigration law. It has nine cosponsors and was referred to the Committee on Ways and Means. To read the bills and see their status, go to: http://1.usa.gov/uCPGYA and search by bill number. To read the Adoption Institute's latest report on adoption by gays and lesbians, "Expanding Resources for Children III," go to: http://bit.ly/uWHMyF.

CONGRESSIONAL COALITION INSTITUTE PROJECT RECOMMENDS BEST PRACTICES
The Congressional Coalition on Adoption Institute held its "Way Forward Project" Final Policy Summit on Nov. 8 to present its findings and recommendations for best practices for children without parental care. The project includes presentations from its four Working Groups: Family Preservation and Reunification; Interim Care Alternatives and Foster Care; Permanency – Kinship, Guardianship, and Domestic and International Adoption; and Legal, Social and Governmental Infrastructure. Attending were high-level U.S. and African government officials, civic and development leaders, corporations, researchers, foundations, and faith-based and community organizations – including the Institute's Executive Director, Adam Pertman. To watch the summit or view presentations, go to: http://bit.ly/rIb4oM.

REPORT FINDS NUMEROUS IRS AUDITS OF FILINGS FOR ADOPTION TAX CREDIT
The Government Accountability Office (GAO) released a report last month, "Adoption Tax Credit: IRS Can Reduce Audits and Refund Delays" (GAO-12-98), finding that the IRS routinely conducted audits of mostly legitimate adoption credit claims that resulted in "considerable" refund payment delays. GAO recommends that to streamline the process, the IRS "communicate with state and local adoption officials, provide examiners with examples of adoption assistance agreements, place the agreements on its website, and determine whether sending a letter before initiating an audit would reduce the need for audits." To access the report and a summary, go to: http://1.usa.gov/sLKcUn. To read a news account about the report, go to: http://bit.ly/sGXGLR.

VIETNAM TO PUT HAGUE CONVENTION INTO EFFECT IN FEBRUARY 2012
A Nov. 10 State Department Notice, "Vietnam ratifies the Hague Adoption Convention," states that the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption will enter into force in Vietnam on Feb. 1, 2012, as it was ratified on Nov. 1. The notice also included a caution to adoption service providers and prospective adoptive parents: "to ensure that adoptions from Vietnam can be compliant with the Convention, important steps must still take place before intercountry adoptions between the United States and Vietnam resume. We further caution adoption service providers against initiating, or claiming to initiate, adoption programs in Vietnam until they receive authorization from the Government of Vietnam." To read the notice, go to: http://1.usa.gov/sJ4X0Q.

 

Research

FIRST-OF-ITS-KIND ANALYSIS FINDS BENEFITS IN EARLY PARENTING, ADOPTION
An analysis of data from two research projects (in Minnesota and Korea) compared the behavioral development of 230 4-8 year-old children in institutional care in Korea with 382 Korean internationally adopted children in the same age range. Researchers found far fewer problem behaviors among adopted than institutionalized children, with the highest level of problems among institutionalized children who had been relinquished by parents and entered care early, as compared to those with living or deceased parents who entered care later. "The Behavioral Development of Korean Children in Institutional Care and International Adoptive Families," by Richard Lee, Kyoung Seol, Matthew Miller, Miyoung Sung and the Minnesota International Adoption Project Team, is in an initial supplemental issue of the International Perspectives in Psychology journal. The researchers found no significant differences on externalizing behaviors between international adoptees and institutionalized children with deceased parents who entered care later and had the protective benefit of forming parental attachments early in life; however, the latter group had significantly more internalizing problems than adopted children. This is the first study to compare children institutionalized in a country to those adopted internationally from that country. To access an abstract, go to: http://bit.ly/w2Bw55.

PROJECT SHOWS BETTER OUTCOMES IN FOSTER OVER INSTITUTIONAL CARE
"The Effects of Severe Psychosocial Deprivation and Foster Care Intervention on Cognitive Development at 8 Years of Age: Findings from the Bucharest Early Intervention Project" examines the differential outcomes of institutionalized children placed in foster homes before 30 months of age and those remaining in institutions beyond age 4. It evaluated the cognitive development of the children from the original study at age 8: 53 in foster care, 50 in institutions, and 38 never-institutionalized Romanian children. The study by Nathan Fox, Alisa Almas, Kathryn Degnan, Charles Nelson and Charles Zeanah, is in the September issue of the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry (Volume 52, Issue 9). The researchers found that foster placement continued to have an effect on children's IQ (significantly higher verbal comprehension and marginally higher full IQ scores), particularly for those who remained in their foster homes. Removal from orphanage before 26 months of age and being attached to a caregiver (assessed at 42 months) predicted higher IQ scores among those moved to foster care. To access an abstract, go to: http://bit.ly/v8AHtA.

CANADIAN RESEARCH: MOST CHINESE ADOPTEES FORM SECURE ATTACHMENTS
An Ontario longitudinal study of attachment development in 30 girls adopted from China (average age at adoption=13 months) found that two years later, 71% were rated as securely attached – which was not significantly different from the 80% of the non-adopted comparison children who were rated securely attached. "Children Adopted from China: Attachment Security Two Years Later," by Nancy Cohen and Fataneh Farnia, is in the November issue of Children and Youth Services Review (Volume 33, Issue 11). The authors concluded that the moderate degree of emotional deprivation experienced by these Chinese girls prior to adoption had not hindered their ability to form a new attachment with their adoptive mothers (attachment to fathers was not assessed). To access an abstract, go to: http://bit.ly/rDWyqG.

SAME-SEX COUPLES IN SMALL TOWNS SAY THEY FACE BARRIERS TO ADOPTION
An interview study of 37 same-sex couples from small communities (most with populations under 50,000) found that many encountered barriers in the adoption process. Obstacles included legal barriers to co-parent or second-parent adoption (41%), nonsupport from family for adopting (25%), difficulty finding an agency that would work with them (18%), unsupportive agency workers (14%) and others. "Working with What We've Got: Perceptions of Barriers and Supports among Small-Metropolitan-Area Same-Sex Adopting Couples," by Lori Kinkler and Abbie Goldberg (an Adoption Institute Senior Fellow), is in the October issue of Family Relations (Volume 60, Issue 4). The researchers reported that respondents often lacked clarity about their legal rights to adopt as a couple and feared that trying to clarify their legal standing could raise red flags in the process. Also, the lack of legal standing of one parent created stress, insecurity and a sense of sadness. The study found that effective social support networks are very important for these prospective parents. For an abstract, go to: http://bit.ly/tUSHoX. To read the latest Adoption Institute report on adoption by gays and lesbians, "Expanding Resources for Children III," go to: http://bit.ly/tsVKxd.

IRISH FOSTER ADOPTION STUDY EXPLORES CHALLENGES RELATED TO CONTACT
Using data from a larger study following children adopted from care prior to age 5 in Northern Ireland, researchers analyzed responses on openness from 20 parent interviews, finding that adoptive parents confronted challenges related to contact, including their own ambivalence, and they could benefit from help in addressing these challenges. "Open Adoption: Adoptive Parents' Experiences of Birth Family Contact and Talking to their Child about Adoption," by Mandi MacDonald and Dominic McSherry, is in the current issue of Adoption & Fostering (Volume 35, Issue 3). Among the 20 interviews randomly selected for this study, 11 children had either direct (4) or letter (7) contact with birthmothers. Adoptive parents reported that the contact or prospect of it provoked strong feelings in them, and they were unsure of its value to their children. Some parents also felt their social workers were ambivalent about or actively discouraged post-adoption contact. To obtain information about this journal, go to: http://bit.ly/vw7Fny.


Please go to the "From Our Partners" section to read the latest research from Adoption Quarterly.
 

News

IL DIOCESES DROP SUIT ON RETAINING CATHOLIC CHARITIES' FOSTER SERVICES
A Nov. 15 Chicago Tribune article reports that three Roman Catholic dioceses – in Joliet, Springfield and Belleville – abandoned their lawsuit against Illinois to maintain Catholic Charities of Illinois' foster care services. "3 dioceses drop foster care lawsuit," by Manya A. Brachear, states that the dioceses will transfer over 1,000 children in foster care, as well as staff, to other agencies. The state had found that Catholic Charities violated Illinois anti-discrimination laws that couples in civil unions be treated the same as married ones by rejecting openly gay foster parents and did not renew Catholic Charities' foster care and adoption contracts. To read the article, go to: http://trib.in/uQTw7Y.

DISPARITIES EXPOSED IN SD CHILD WELFARE FOR NATIVE AMERICAN CHILDREN
"Incentives and Cultural Bias Fuel Foster System," part one of a three-part National Public Radio Oct. 25-27 investigative series by Laura Sullivan and Amy Walters, found that Native American children make up less than 15% of South Dakota's child population, but more than half of children in foster care. According to the story, Native American children in the state are more than twice as likely to be placed in foster care as children of other races and almost 90% are placed in non-native homes or group care; that conflicts with the Indian Child Welfare Act, which puts a high priority on keeping Native American children with family members, relatives, their tribes or other Native Americans. To read the article and series, go to: http://n.pr/skADIg.

ARTICLE EXPLORES REASONS FOR LARGE NUMBER OF RUSSIAN 'ORPHANS'
According to the "The Orphan Factory" by Boris Altshuler, Board Chairman of a children's nonprofit organization, there are over 100,000 new orphans in Russia annually, 25% of whom are placed in institutions. The Nov. 21 article in Russia Beyond the Headlines reports that child-care institutions housed more than 300,000 in 2009, with two-thirds of these children being "voluntarily surrendered by their parents to the state because the children had health problems or because the family was poor or dysfunctional." The author states that the country lacks a social safety net and the state encourages parents to place their children in state-run boarding schools. To read the article, go to: http://bit.ly/vKRdUI.

 

Resources

ADOPTUSKIDS WEBINAR HIGHLIGHTS RESOURCES TO INCREASE ADOPTIONS
A 90-minute webinar, "Build Capacity to Make Lasting Change," sponsored by AdoptUSKids and its partners on Oct. 27, is now available online and highlights new, primarily web-based resources for promoting adoptions. The presenters include: Alicia Gallant from Child Welfare Information Gateway, Kathy Ledesma of AdoptUSKids, Allison Mantz of the Ad Council, Vanessa Casavant and Juana Dano of AdoptUSKids, and Natalie Lyons of the National Resource Center for Adoption. To access the webinar, register at the following website: http://bit.ly/vQ5iVV.

RUDD PROGRAM POSTS 2011 DOZIER KEYNOTE ON ATTACHMENT AND BEHAVIOR
The Rudd Adoption Research Program at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst – which is headed by Harold Grotevant, an Adoption Institute Senior Research Fellow – has posted a video on its website of the keynote speaker at its 2011 annual conference, Dr. Mary Dozier, who spoke on "Attachment and Biobehavioral Catch-Up: An Intervention for Parents of Young Children Who Have Experienced Adversity." The website also contains research summaries of Dozier's search on the efficacy of this intervention. To access the video, go to: http://bit.ly/soHQVU.

REPORT EXAMINES BRAIN RESEARCH IMPLICATIONS FOR YOUTH EXITING CARE
The Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative issued a report, "The Adolescent Brain: New Research and Its Implication for Young People Transitioning from Foster Care," reviewing findings on adolescent brain development and their implications for child welfare practice with older youth in foster care and those leaving care. It provides recommendations for meeting their developmental needs, including allowing youth to remain in care until age 21. To access the summary and report, go to: http://bit.ly/sgMrcD. To read the Adoption Institute's report on older youth in care, "Never Too Old," go to: http://bit.ly/rPVGP5.

GUIDELINES ON WORK WITH BIRTHPARENTS IN RIGHTS' TERMINATION CASES
"Birth Parents' Perceptions of Professional Practice in Child Care and Adoption Proceedings: Implications for Practice," by Joe Smeeton and Kathy Boxall, is in the November issue of Child & Family Social Work (Volume 16, Issue 4). Based on a literature review and interviews with three birthparents, the authors make practice recommendations for social workers working with children and birthparents. Some suggestions include: providing clear information about proceedings, making supervised contact comfortable and expectations clear, providing an opportunity to say good-bye and making sure parents have access to personal support. To access an abstract, go to: http://bit.ly/u1uEne.

 

From Our Partners

ADOPTION QUARTERLY: INFANT-ADOPTED GIRLS HAVE MORE ISSUES THAN BOYS
Data from the Colorado Adoption Project, a longitudinal study of behavioral genetics, was used to compare the level of behavior problems in 202 infant-adopted 17-year-olds and 215 non-adopted youth, finding significantly more conduct problems in adopted girls than non-adopted controls, but no significant difference for boys or for the groups with genders combined. "Conduct Problems in Adopted and Non-Adopted Adolescents and Adoption Satisfaction as a Protective Factor," by Renea Nilsson, Soo Rhee, Robin Corley, Sally-Ann Rhea, Sally Wadsworth and John Defries, is in the current issue of Adoption Quarterly (Volume 14, Issue 3). The study also found that higher levels of teen and parent adoption satisfaction were associated with lower levels of conduct problems. To access an abstract, go to: www.adoptinfo.net.

ADOPTION TODAY: NEW ISSUE LOOKS AT HOLIDAY CELEBRATIONS ... AND MORE
The December issue of Adoption Today includes stories on surviving the wait to adopt through the holidays, creating unique family traditions, and observing holiday traditions for your child's birth country or culture – and it gives plenty of reason for families to celebrate. This issue also includes articles about support groups for birthparents, how the Spoon Foundation is impacting children's health globally, ways to support adoptees when they are searching and so much more – including a monthly page by Adoption Institute staff members about the Institute's work. Consider giving the gift of Adoption Today to your friends and family for the holidays; the magazine will make a donation to the Adoption Institute for every new $12 subscription (12 issues). To learn more or subscribe, go to: www.CWLA.org.

ADOPTION LEARNING PARTNERS: NEW COURSE ON CARING FOR CHILDREN'S HAIR
ALP released its newest course, Caring for Your African American Child's Hair: Learning Techniques, Understanding Differences, Building Confidence. Experts will help parents understand the impact of hair care on self-esteem and cultural identity; learn basic techniques; and recognize the myths versus the realities relating to the issue. Hair can be a big part of how children see themselves, so treating and styling their hair well can boost not only a parent's self-esteem, but also a child's. To register, go to: http://bit.ly/ucTrVu.

 

Institute Update

PRESIDENT CLINTON PRAISES INSTITUTE'S WORK AND URGES SUPPORT FOR IT
The Adoption Institute was proud and honored to host President Bill Clinton at a reception on Nov. 17. The former President discussed his long-standing commitment to children in need of loving homes. He told the audience that it was his wife, Hillary, who first brought to his attention the inequities in the foster care system and barriers to adoption from it – obstacles that they worked to overcome when he was governor of Arkansas and when they went to the White House. Clinton praised the Institute's work and encouraged those gathered to support its efforts. The Institute is deeply grateful to the President for giving us his time and support – and to his staff, led by Doug Band, for making this marvelous evening possible. To see photos of the event, which raised funds for the Institute's unique programs and projects, go to: www.adoptioninstitute.org/old.

MARTHA HENRY JOINS STAFF IN NEW POSITION OF EDUCATION DIRECTOR
The Institute is proud to announce that Martha J. Henry, Ph.D. – a respected and accomplished educator, trainer and author in the fields of adoption and foster care – joined our staff this month as Education Director. Dr. Henry comes to the Institute after four years as the Director of the Office for Foster Care and Adoption (formerly the Center for Adoption Research) at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Her responsibilities will include research on a wide range of Institute initiatives, including professional trainings and programs and projects such as Educate the Educators. For more information about Dr. Henry, please go to: http://bit.ly/uunz7F.

INCLUDE THE INSTITUTE IN TAX PLANNING, YEAR-END GIVING – AND AS A GIFT
As we approach year's end, please consider making a donation to support the important work of the Adoption Institute. We know that you, as a reader of this newsletter, care about ethics and equity, and understand the importance of evidence-based, enlightened practice and policies. Simply put, we cannot further our high-impact initiatives for countless children and families without your support. So, as you do your tax planning and year-end giving, please make a donation of cash or appreciated securities. In particular, by donating your appreciated stocks or bonds, you receive a significant tax break over and above the basic charitable deduction. For more information or to discuss your giving plans, please contact Development Director William Boltz at [email protected] or (212) 925-4089.

The IRA Charitable Rollover is another way to support our work. It permits taxpayers age 70˝ and older to donate directly from their IRAs – and it doesn't count as part of adjusted gross income and the gift isn't subject to taxes!

A GREAT PRESENT! Here's an idea for just the right holiday gift for those hard-to-please relatives, friends and colleagues: Rather than sending another sweater to Aunt Betty or a fruitcake to your old college roommate, why not show that someone special that you are thinking of them by making a donation in their name to the Institute? It's a great way to honor people who mean the most to you, and we will happily notify them of your generosity. To donate online, please go to: http://bit.ly/a83ChS or include a note with your check to The Adoption Institute, 120 East 38th Street, New York, NY 10016.

LEARN ABOUT OUR WORK AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS IN 2011 ANNUAL REPORT
We are pleased to share our 2011 Annual Report, which looks at the broad range of important programs, projects, policy initiatives, advocacy – and accomplishments – of the Adoption Institute during the past fiscal year. Inside, you will also be reminded of our mission, read messages from both Executive Director Adam Pertman and Board President Susan Notkin and learn about upcoming work. To access the report, go to: http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/old.

IN THE MEDIA: HIGHLIGHTS OF OUR WORK, PERTMAN INTERVIEWS, COMMENTARY
On Nov. 2, ABC News ran a story on states that do not allow second-parent adoption, referring to the Institute's recent report on best practices for professionals working with gay and lesbian adoptive parents, "Expanding Resources for Children III." To read the story, go to: http://abcn.ws/rMy05Y. To read the Institute's report, go to: http://bit.ly/tsVKxd.

In a Nov. 17 National Public Radio report, "Fewer Babies Available For Adoption By U.S. Parents," Alan Greenblatt reported that many other countries are curtailing international adoption of their children, and quotes Pertman as saying: "It's a tumultuous time right now in the world of intercountry adoption." To read the article, go to: http://n.pr/rLxxCY.

The Huffington Post, on Nov. 21, ran a commentary by Pertman entitled "Kids Win When We Replace Stigma With Best Practices for Gay Parents." In it, Pertman discusses the reality that many more children are being raised by gay fathers and lesbian mothers and states, "I'm happy to report that research and experience show that non-heterosexual parents bring up their children as thoughtfully, competently and with as positive results as their straight counterparts." To read the article, go to: http://huff.to/w2tVD4. The commentary is also available on Pertman's blog, www.adampertman.com.

On Nov. 26, the Wisconsin State Journal ran a story about proposed legislation that would allow a person to abandon a newborn without any penalty before the child is 30 days old, changing the current law that allows abandonment within 72 hours. Expressing concern, Pertman said that "extending the window to 30 days could allow a parent to abuse a child and wait for bruises to fade." To read the article, go to: http://bit.ly/shNSwH. To read the Adoption Institute's report on the subject, "Unintended Consequences," go to: http://bit.ly/stWCeU.

A Parenting.com article, "The New Normal: Stay-at-Home Dads, Gay Parents and More" quotes Pertman: "as support for legal gay marriage has grown, along with the body of research that shows same-sex parents to be just as committed, so, too, has the acceptance of gay parenthood." To read the article, go to: http://bit.ly/tzAbyE. Or, to access it in a Nov. 29 story on CNN, go to: http://bit.ly/rYYh8f.

A Nov. 15, About.com article, "Hollywood Adoption Updates and Happenings," cites the Institute's "Beyond Culture Camp: Promoting Healthy Identity Formation in Adoption" report for its finding that travel to a person's birth country and having same-race role-models are important factors in the development of a healthy race identity. To read the article, go to: http://bit.ly/rMf5OS. To read the Institute's report, go to: http://bit.ly/vkHe12.

On Nov. 16, an interview with Pertman by Fran Cronin was published in Talking Writing, a magazine for writers. In it, Pertman states that "we teach our kids something by being open. It's only normal that kids want to meet their bio parents. Adoption may be different or feel harder, but we need to internalize it as our normal. It helps us appreciate our kids on their own terms. And I like to think honesty and openness always trump shame." To read the interview, go to: http://bit.ly/uAqxSS. Or access it in a Nov. 23 post at Adopt-a-tude, a website of WBUR (National Public Radio): http://bit.ly/rCP8Pg.

On Nov. 16, Pertman was a guest on The Michael Eric Dyson Show discussing transracial and LGBT adoption, permanency plans for children in foster care, and his two new books, "Adoption Nation: How the Adoption Revolution is Transforming Our Families - and America" and "Adoption by Lesbians and Gay Men: A New Dimension in Family Diversity." To listen to the interview, go to: http://bit.ly/vZtq1C. To learn more about Pertman's books, go to his blog, www.adampertman.com.

Pertman conducted a webinar with Kiwi Magazine's "Kiwi College" on Nov. 17 entitled "Adoption in 21st Century America: A Revolution in the Family," which focused on his new book "Adoption Nation." Pertman discussed the profound changes taking place in the world of adoption and the institution's impact on over 100 million Americans in their immediate families. Among other comments during the hour-long webinar, he stated that "we need to get to a point where our lives and our families are normalized in law and policy, in people's attitudes." To access the webinar, go to: http://bit.ly/sZF2ce.

UPCOMING STAFF APPEARANCES
The following is a partial listing of upcoming appearances and/or presentations by Pertman and Institute senior staff. For a complete list, go to: http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/old/events/appearances.php. To inquire about Institute staff availability for speaking engagements, call 212-925-4089 or email [email protected].

  • December 3 – Dr. David Brodzinsky will present "Understanding and Managing Loss in Adoption and Foster Care: A guideline for pediatricians and mental health professionals" as part of the American Academy of Pediatrics Continuing Education Program in San Francisco. For more information and to register, go to: http://bit.ly/vYczOs.
  • December 8 – The Institute, in collaboration with Bright Futures Adoption Center, the MA Department of Children and Families and the Massachusetts Adoption Resource Exchange, will host a free adoption outreach event based on the Institute's "Never Too Old" report to educate families of color about the adoption process. The event will be held at Ray and Joan Kroc Corps and Community Center in Boston from 7-9pm. For more information and to RSVP, go to: http://bit.ly/t9mtau.
  • December 7 & 14– Dr. David Brodzinsky will present Skype-based workshops for mental health professionals, sponsored by the St. Louis Psychoanalytic Institute. On the 7th, the focus will be "Openness in Adoption" and on the 14th, "LGBT Adoptive Families." For more information and to register, go to: http://bit.ly/uPhZMt.

 

About the Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute

Since its establishment in 1996, the Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute has been a pre-eminent, independent voice for improving adoption for everyone it touches - particularly children - through innovative programs, educational initiatives, research and analysis, and advocacy for better practices, policies and laws.

Our award-winning web site, www.adoptioninstitute.org/old, is a popular and reliable source for accurate adoption information. Re-read our past e-Newsletters at: http://bit.ly/archivednewsletter.


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