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1. Law, Policy & Practice
- Russian Localities Place 'De Facto Freeze' on International Adoptions
- U.S. Reports Developments on Adoptions from India, Cambodia, Others
- Korea Seeks to Make Protection of Biological Families a Priority
- Birth Certificate Access Bill Advances in Two States, Fails in Another
- Missouri Legislation would Eliminate Race as Factor in Foster Adoption
- England Considering Reforms to Speed Adoptions from Temporary Care
- Utah Considers Voluntary Notice to Fathers as Court Cases Proceed

2. Research
- Adoption Institute Survey on Openness Finds Closed Adoptions Now Rare
- Study: Increased Adoptions Contributed to Decline in U.S. Foster Care
- Review Identifies Gaps in Safeguards Provided by Hague Convention
- Parenting Quality Found to Moderate Impact of Institutionalization
- Attachment Seen Better in Children after Foster than Orphanage Care
- Researchers Examine the Reasons Gay Men Want to Become Parents

3. News
- Thousands of Illinois Adoptees File for Original Birth Certificates
- Suit in Canada Alleges Women were Coerced to Give Babies for Adoption
- Child Abduction, Trafficking Reported in Numerous Countries

4. Resources
- Information Gateway Publishes Brief on Searching for Birth Relatives
- Creating a Family Offers Tip Sheet on Avoiding Delays in Tax Credit
- Archived Webinar Specifies Steps for Implementing Practice Models
- ISS Monthly Review Explores Issues of Social Media and Searching

5. From Our Partners
- Current AQ Issue: Study Investigates Core Issues in Adoption
- Adoption Learning Partners Releases Course on Open Adoption 101
- Adoption Today's April Issue Focuses on Identity and Much More

6. Institute Update
- Invitations are in the Mail for our Best –– and Tastiest –– Benefit Ever!
- Help Us Conduct Vital Research on the Internet's Impact on Adoption
- In the Media: Celebrities, Social Networks, Knowledge and Connections
- Upcoming Staff Appearances

 

Law, Policy & Practice

RUSSIAN LOCALITIES PLACE 'DE FACTO FREEZE' ON INTERNATIONAL ADOPTIONS
The U.S. has not received an official notice, but some local Russian authorities "have instituted a de facto freeze on adoptions to the United States" by refusing to provide referrals that are required to schedule court dates, according to a March 1 U.S. State Department Notice titled "Regional Suspensions on Adoption Processing in Russia." A March 7 RIA Novosti article, "Putin urges limiting foreign adoption of Russian kids," reports that the President-elect stated that permanent families for children should be found in Russia, that intercountry adoption for them should be a "rare exception" and that international adoption agencies were not cooperating with Russian authorities in executing monitoring responsibilities. To read the Notice, go to: http://1.usa.gov/GW4jVI; to read the news article, go to: http://bit.ly/HjnRRg.

U.S. REPORTS DEVELOPMENTS ON ADOPTIONS FROM INDIA, CAMBODIA, OTHERS
A number of U.S. State Department updates report on the situations in various sending countries. India's Central Adoption Resource Authority provided notice that it will process new adoption applications under its new guidelines as of Jan. 20, 2012. The Cambodian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation reported a delay in accepting adoption petitions until Jan. 1, 2013. Senegal is temporarily suspending new adoption cases while it implements Hague Convention requirements, but will allow some pending cases to proceed. Orphanages in the Democratic Republic of the Congo reportedly are not promptly releasing children who have been legally adopted. To read about these developments, go to: http://1.usa.gov/GW4dNL.

KOREA SEEKS TO MAKE PROTECTION OF BIOLOGICAL FAMILIES A PRIORITY
Korea's Ministry of Health and Welfare on March 12 released a notice saying that a recent amendment to the Special Adoption Act (enacted in 2011), which places "priority on the protection of a child's biological family," will be implemented in Aug. 2012. The amendment's reforms include requiring domestic adoption attempts for five months before intercountry adoption; provision of information and counseling to biological parents, along with a seven-day deliberation period; equal status for adopted children; adoptive parent background checks; judicial procedural requirements; post-adoption monitoring; and guaranteeing access to information for adoptees. To read about the policy, go to: http://bit.ly/HhEFe1.

BIRTH CERTIFICATE ACCESS BILL ADVANCES IN TWO STATES, FAILS IN ANOTHER
Connecticut's Select Committee on Children on March 8 voted in favor of SB296, legislation that would restore adult adoptees' (21 years or older) access to their original birth certificates (OBCs), effective June 1, 2013. The bill, which was sent to the Joint Judiciary Committee, also provides for birthparent contact preference and health history forms. The Oklahoma House of Representatives this month passed and sent to the state Senate HB2634, the Oklahoma Truth in Adoption Act, permitting adopted adults to receive their OBCs and birthparents to file contact preference forms. The Maryland House Judiciary Committee, meanwhile, on March 23 unfavorably reported on HB719, which would have given all adopted people age 18 and older access to their OBCs and prospectively removed a disclosure veto in current state law, which permits access only to those adopted after 2000 (at age 21). To read the bills and find out their status, go to: Connecticut – http://1.usa.gov/GWNo0B; Oklahoma – http://bit.ly/wSzg6T; Maryland – http://bit.ly/wLOFS4. To read the Adoption Institute's latest report on the subject, "For the Records II," go to: http://bit.ly/9CICPT.

MISSOURI LEGISLATION WOULD ELIMINATE RACE AS FACTOR IN FOSTER ADOPTION
The Missouri Senate on March 8 passed SB711, which would preclude the consideration of a child's, biological parent's or prospective adoptive parent's race or ethnicity in best interest and suitability and placement assessments. The current law's diligent recruitment requirement and provision against placement delay or denial based on race would not be affected by the bill. The legislation is pending in the House of Representatives. To read the bill and learn its status, go to: http://1.usa.gov/H0dTBuTo read the Adoption Institute's report on the subject, "Finding Families for African American Children," go to: http://bit.ly/uZ0uj4.

ENGLAND CONSIDERING REFORMS TO SPEED ADOPTIONS FROM TEMPORARY CARE
The Department of Education's March 2012 Action Plan for Adoption: Tackling Delay, drafted by an expert working group, seeks to facilitate timely adoption for children waiting in temporary care in England. Among the proposed reforms are: creating a national adoption information gateway, preventing delays caused by attempts at ethnic matching, instituting a shorter two-stage approval process, providing a revised prospective adopter assessment form and increasing accountability. The government reports that children's average wait time from coming into care to being adopted was 21 months and Black children waited about a year longer to be adopted than did their White and Asian counterparts. A March 9 BBC article by Angela Harrison, "Adoption: David Cameron vows to cut adoption delays" reports that there are 6,770 children waiting to be adopted. To read the plan, go to: http://bit.ly/H0J9oj; to read the article, go to: http://bbc.in/GX3RHG. To read the Adoption Institute's report on the subject, "Finding Families for African American Children," go to: http://bit.ly/uZ0uj4.

UTAH CONSIDERS VOLUNTARY NOTICE TO FATHERS AS COURT CASES PROCEED
The Utah legislature passed and sent to the Governor for signature SB55, which provides a voluntary procedure for women to give notice to biological fathers of their plan to place a child for adoption; the men would then have 30 days to waive or assert their rights. A similar bill, HB308, would have made such notice to fathers mandatory; it was defeated. Fathers' rights in Utah are also the subject of two court cases: A March 21 Salt Lake Tribune article by Brooke Adams, "Colorado father's custody fight moves back to his home state," reports that a Utah judge dismissed the adoption of a Colorado man's infant daughter placed for adoption in Utah without his consent, sending the custody case to Colorado. And according to a March 15 KSL 5 News story by Lori Prichard, "Search for child stopped cold by Utah adoption laws, father says," a Pennsylvania man states that his infant daughter was placed for adoption by her mother in Utah without his consent; he is appealing to the state's Supreme Court a lower court's decision to dismiss his case because he did not assert parental rights within the required time period. To read the bill, go to: http://1.usa.gov/H0IYJD; to read the articles, go to: http://bit.ly/Hfrl8F and http://bit.ly/GWMNMl.

 

Research

ADOPTION INSTITUTE SURVEY ON OPENNESS FINDS CLOSED ADOPTIONS NOW RARE
The Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute released a new study this month, "Openness in Adoption: From Secrecy and Stigma to Knowledge and Connections," by Deborah Siegel and Susan Smith. The report synthesizes research knowledge on openness in infant adoptions, finding that the practice has grown steadily over the past three decades, and the Institute's survey of 100 adoption agencies found that for adoptions completed over a two-year period, 55 percent were fully disclosed (parties met and exchanged identifying information). Only 5 percent were closed and the remaining 40 percent were mediated. A qualitative analysis of survey and interview responses explored the factors that make open adoptions work well. The paper's research review found that most participants in open adoptions are very positive about their experiences and benefits are reported for all parties. To read the report, go to: http://bit.ly/GVt9Rh.

STUDY: INCREASED ADOPTIONS CONTRIBUTED TO DECLINE IN U.S. FOSTER CARE
A comparative study of child welfare systems in 10 countries found that the U.S. is the only one that experienced a decline in out-of-home placements over 10-15 years. The researchers cited two primary reasons: informal kinship care as a diversion from the child welfare system and a 50 percent increase in adoptions from 1998 to 2007. "A Comparative Study of Child Welfare Systems: Abstract Orientations and Concrete Results," by Neil Gilbert, is in the March issue of Children and Youth Services Review (Volume 34, Issue 3). The analysis of the U.S. system also reported an increase in the rate of children who were subjects of maltreatment reports over a decade, a decline in substantiation rate of reports, a higher percentage of victims placed in care, and a five-fold increase in the number of children receiving preventive services. To read the abstract, go to: http://bit.ly/HmayNK. To read the Adoption Institute's report on facilitating adoptions of older youth from foster care, go to: http://bit.ly/rPVGP5.

REVIEW IDENTIFIES GAPS IN SAFEGUARDS PROVIDED BY HAGUE CONVENTION
"Does the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption Adequately Protect Orphaned and Vulnerable Children and Their Families?" by Karen Smith Rotabi and Judith L. Gibbons reviews the Convention's impact on safeguarding the rights and interests of children and birth families. The article in Journal of Child and Family Studies (Volume 21, Number 1) evaluates the United States' requirements as a case example that illustrates problems with oversight, financial transparency, birth parent relinquishment and adoptions from non-Convention sending countries. The authors propose that in addition to Hague implementation, all countries also enact "specific, contextually appropriate laws and regulations." To read the abstract, go to: http://bit.ly/GWFqIo.

PARENTING QUALITY FOUND TO MODERATE IMPACT OF INSTITUTIONALIZATION
Researchers found a relationship between parenting quality (measured by Emotional Availability Scales) soon after placement of children adopted from orphanages between 10-17 months of age and aspects of children's social functioning (emotional understanding and indiscriminate friendliness) at least 18 months after adoption. "Postadoption Parenting and Socioemotional Development in Postinstitutionalized Children," by Melissa Garvin, Amanda Tarullo, Mark van Ryzin and Megan Gunnar, is in the February issue of Development and Psychopathology (Volume 24, Issue 1). The researchers concluded that even though adoptive parents of post-institutionalized children had generally high scores on parenting, their scores on two (of four) scales were less positive than the scores of parents of non-adopted children. They attributed this to the challenges involved and recommended interventions designed to enhance parenting. To read the abstract, go to: http://bit.ly/GYdCC7.

ATTACHMENT SEEN BETTER IN CHILDREN AFTER FOSTER THAN ORPHANAGE CARE
Mother-infant attachments of 92 Dutch children adopted from China at 11-16 months of age (grouped by foster or institutional care backgrounds) were assessed at two and six months after arrival, finding that the percentage who were securely attached in the foster care group (48% at Time 2) was greater than those from institutions (36% at Time 2). "Infants' Responsiveness, Attachment, and Indiscriminate Friendliness after International Adoption from Institutions or Foster Care in China: Application of Emotional Availability Scales to Adoptive Families," by Linda van den Dries, Femme Juffer, et al., is in the February issue of Development and Psychopathology (Volume 24, Issue 1). The two groups did not differ significantly on indiscriminate friendliness, and greater maternal sensitivity as well as higher cognitive scores in children were associated with less indiscriminate friendliness. To read the abstract, go to: http://bit.ly/Hfq5Cv.

RESEARCHERS EXAMINE THE REASONS GAY MEN WANT TO BECOME PARENTS
"Why Parenthood, and Why Now? Gay Men's Motivations for Pursuing Parenthood," by Abbie Goldberg (an Adoption Institute Senior Fellow), Jordan Downing and April Moyer, is a qualitative study based on interviews with 70 pre-adoptive gay men. The study, published in the February issue of Family Relations (Volume 61, Issue 1), found that most of their motivations for parenting were similar to those of heterosexuals – the personal and psychological rewards of parenting – although some reasons were reflective of their sexual minority or adoptive status. Some reported feeling that they had a lot to give a child, wanted to provide a home to a child in need or desired to teach a child tolerance. Some factors prompting the timing of their pursuit of adoption included age, finding a partner who wanted to parent, attaining relationship stability, and achieving career and financial stability. To read the abstract, go to: http://bit.ly/GWLVHz. To read the Adoption Institute's latest report on adoption by gays and lesbians, go to: http://bit.ly/tsVKxd.


Please go to the "From Our Partners" section to read the latest research from Adoption Quarterly.
 

News

THOUSANDS OF ILLINOIS ADOPTEES FILE FOR ORIGINAL BIRTH CERTIFICATES
A March 18 Chicago Tribune article, "New law gives birth records to adoptees" by Lolly Bowean, reported that 5,485 adopted adults have applied for copies of their original birth certificates (OBCs) under the state's 2010 law restoring their access to these documents; the law went into effect in Nov. 2011. The Illinois Department of Public Health reported that there are so many requests that "there is a backlog to fill them." A total of about 250,000 adopted adults are eligible to receive their OBCs, and about 1,400 have already gotten theirs. (Those born before 1946 could apply for their OBCs before November.). To read the article, go to: http://trib.in/GVsuiH. To read the Adoption Institute's latest report on the subject, "For the Records II," go to: http://bit.ly/9CICPT.

SUIT IN CANADA ALLEGES WOMEN WERE COERCED TO GIVE BABIES FOR ADOPTION
A March 16 National Post article by Kathryn Blaze Carlson, "B.C. government hit with class-action lawsuit over coerced adoption claims," reports that the lawsuit on behalf of birthmothers was filed against the British Columbia government alleging abduction, fraud and coercion around the adoptions of infants born to single women from the 1940s to the 1990s. The article said dozens of women have stated they were forced to relinquish their children because they were unmarried, though the government is "not aware of any official policy that would have forced unwed mothers to give up their children for adoption." Similar suits are expected in other provinces. To read the article, go to: http://natpo.st/HdKc6i. To read the Adoption Institute's report, "Safeguarding the Rights and Well-Being of Birthparents in the Adoption Process," go to: http://bit.ly/n4ZXSs.

CHILD ABDUCTION, TRAFFICKING REPORTED IN NUMEROUS COUNTRIES
A March 11 article in e-Kantipur.com, "China frees 24,000 abducted women, kids in 2011," reports that the Ministry of Public Security announced that Chinese police last year rescued 8,660 children and 15,458 women who were trafficked for labor, adoption and prostitution. National Public Radio's March 16 Morning Edition includes an interview with The New Yorker's Francisco Goldman about his article "Children of the Dirty War," about military abductions of children from their parents as part of a terror campaign in Argentina 30 years ago. And a March 16 Guardian article by Giles Tremlett, "Spanish baby-snatching investigators accuse 80-year-old nun," provides an update on the investigation into over 1,500 cases of suspected illegal trafficking of babies stolen and placed for adoption over four decades until the 1980s. To read these articles and others, go to: China – http://bit.ly/GZU90o; Argentina – http://n.pr/GYcVbS; Spain – http://bit.ly/H0bY03; Mexico – http://bit.ly/Hjk3j0 and Nepal http://bit.ly/H0GZoG

 

Resources

INFORMATION GATEWAY PUBLISHES BRIEF ON SEARCHING FOR BIRTH RELATIVES
The Child Welfare Information Gateway recently published a brief entitled "Searching for Birth Relatives," an 18-page summary of a range of search-related topics. They include steps in the process, the use of professional searchers, social media, reunion issues, resources and others. To read the brief, go to: http://1.usa.gov/GVrH1d.

CREATING A FAMILY OFFERS TIP SHEET ON AVOIDING DELAYS IN TAX CREDIT
Creating a Family, a nonprofit adoption education and support organization, offers "Top Ten Tips for Avoiding Delays When Filing for the Adoption Tax Credit," based on interviews with experts and taxpayer suggestions, and provides links to online resources. To read the tip sheet, go to: http://bit.ly/Hn5Thi.

ARCHIVED WEBINAR SPECIFIES STEPS FOR IMPLEMENTING PRACTICE MODELS
The National Child Welfare Resource Center for Organizational Improvement made available a recording of a Nov. 29 webinar, "Implementing and Sustaining Practice Models," with presentations by North Carolina and New Jersey child welfare agencies on the steps they took to implement new practice models statewide. There are also links to handouts and other resources. To access the archived webinar, go to: http://bit.ly/Hhzt9O.

ISS MONTHLY REVIEW EXPLORES ISSUES OF SOCIAL MEDIA AND SEARCHING
January's Monthly Review from the International Social Service, based in Geneva, Switzerland, contained an editorial entitled "New Challenges in the Search for Origins," reflecting on the growing role of social networks in searching. Also included in this review were a column, "Facebook and Post-adoption Contacts: New Issues," as well as a Reader's Forum column on searching. To read the issue, go to: http://bit.ly/GWDYWC.

 

From Our Partners

CURRENT AQ ISSUE: STUDY INVESTIGATES CORE ISSUES IN ADOPTION
"Exploring Core Issues in Adoption: Individual and Marital Experience of Adoptive Mothers," by Tina Timm, John Mooradian and Robert Hock, in the current issue of Adoption Quarterly (Volume 14, Issue 4), investigated the extent to which 104 mothers who had adopted 196 children from a range of sources reported experiencing eight core issues of adoption, both individually and in their marriages. Overall, the majority of parents reported struggling with four core issues both individually and as a couple (loss and grief, unmatched expectations, mastery and control, and bonding and attachment), and the others were reportedly experienced by fewer than half of the parents. To read an abstract, go to: http://bit.ly/ysruNy.

ADOPTION LEARNING PARTNERS RELEASES COURSE ON OPEN ADOPTION 101
Celebrating the publication of the Adoption Institute's latest study on Openness in Adoption (see Research section above), Adoption Learning Partners is featuring its recently released course, Open Adoption 101: What to Expect, How to Establish, Ways to Stay Connected. The course helps parents understand the benefits of and navigate potential challenges associated with open adoption relationships. To learn more and to register, go to: http://bit.ly/GKwFNj.

ADOPTION TODAY'S APRIL ISSUE FOCUSES ON IDENTITY ... AND MUCH MORE
How do you know who you are as a person? How much of that comes from genetics, how much from environment? Adoptive families help their children discover who they are on their life journey, while adopted individuals process who they are based on their history. These experiences are shared in the April issue of Adoption Today. And sprinkled throughout the issue are great stories from birthparents, adoptive parents and others –– and, as always, there's a page featuring the work of the Adoption Institute. Remember, for every subscription to Adoption Today, a donation will be made to the Institute. To subscribe ($12 for an annual subscription of 12 issues), go to: www.adoptinfo.net.

 

Institute Update

INVITATIONS ARE IN THE MAIL FOR OUR BEST – AND TASTIEST – BENEFIT EVER!
On May 10, the Adoption Institute will hold its 9th Annual Taste of Spring benefit in New York. The event, our major fundraiser of the year, features boutique wines from around the world and master chefs from many great restaurants. This year's wine list is especially impressive, featuring such starts as Domaine Carneros, Sequoia Grove, Sherry-Lehmann, Tablelands Wine Co., The Seeker and Xavier Flouret Wines. The list of participating restaurants is equally stellar: Alison Eighteen, Artisanal Premium Cheese, Kumquat Cupcakery, Landmarc, La Quenelle, Lavo, Perry St by Jean Georges, Pie Corps, Sen and Tao. Our event Co-Chairs – Kim Donaldson, Hollis Forbes, Sandy McManus, Holly Heston Rochell and Lisa Selz – encourage you to buy tickets soon, because they will go fast and they'd hate to see you left out. They also urge you to consider an individual or corporate sponsorship, and this year there will be another way to support our important work while saluting our honorees, Nicholas Scoppetta and Bank of America. A Tribute Book will serve as both the evening's program and a keepsake; ad space is available in full-, half- and quarter-page sizes. For more information about ads, sponsorships or other questions, please contact Development Director William Boltz, at (212) 925-4089 or wboltz@adoptioninstitute.org. To buy tickets, please visit our website, http://bit.ly/GX07pE.

HELP US CONDUCT VITAL RESEARCH ON THE INTERNET'S IMPACT ON ADOPTION
The Internet is dramatically reshaping the world of adoption for everyone, from professionals working in the field, to children and adults searching for (and finding) relatives on social media. Institute researchers have begun a groundbreaking project on the impact of these historic changes on millions of lives; our initiative will provide the first-ever targeted, research-based recommendations and resources relating to ethics, best practices and safeguards. You can help advance this vital project in two ways: By sending your suggestions and personal experiences by email to InternetProjectAI@google.com and by helping to fund this critical work. While we have already received generous contributions from concerned individuals and organizations across the country, this project – extensive in scope and potential impact – requires more support. If you believe in the value of this work as much as we do, please send your check to The Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute, 120 East 38th Street, New York, NY 10016, and write "Internet Project" on the memo line, or make your contribution on our website at www.adoptioninstitute.org/old. To discuss funding the project in more depth, please contact our Development Director, William Boltz, at wboltz@adoptioninstitute.org or (212) 925-4089.

IN THE MEDIA: CELEBRITIES, SOCIAL NETWORKS, KNOWLEDGE AND CONNECTIONS
The Institute's latest publication, "Openness in Adoption: From Secrecy and Stigma to Knowledge and Connections," received extensive media coverage throughout the United States. To read the Associated Press article in USA Today, go to: http://usat.ly/GX3Q2l; to read the Washington Times article, go to: http://bit.ly/GYksu2.

Executive Director Pertman wrote about the Institute's "Openness in Adoption" report in a March 27 column on The Huffington Post entitled "New Realities in the Extended Family: Who Is the Woman Celebrating Thanksgiving with Your Next-Door Neighbors?" In it, he writes that the lack of knowledge about adoption has "considerable" repercussions –– "from inaccurate, corrosive stereotypes about the women who place their children for adoption; to uninformed, undermining attitudes about adoptive families; to obsolete laws and policies that treat adopted individuals as second-class citizens; to genuine surprise among most people when they learn about adoption's current realities." To read the column on The Huffington Post, go to: http://huff.to/GV7pqq. To read it on Adam's Blog, go to: www.adampertman.com.

On March 15, Adam Pertman appeared on Good Morning America to discuss celebrity adoptions – a segment that keyed off the recent adoption by actress Charlize Theron of a baby boy named Jackson. Pertman discussed the many variables in the process of adoption and said it opens the door to parenthood to many people, not just celebrities. To see the segment, go to 42 minutes in the link: http://abcn.ws/GStWI5.

In a March 12 Columbus Dispatch article, "Couples eager to adopt make appeals on social media" – which dealt with prospective adoptive parents' use of Facebook, Twitter and YouTube to connect with expectant parents considering adoption for their babies – Pertman is quoted as saying, "It's tricky territory. People have to be thoughtful about how to do this. You're not going out there shopping." To read the article, go to: http://bit.ly/GQVEog.

On March 25, Pertman was the hour-long guest on CBS New York on the Bob Salter Radio Show talking about the Institute's work and his new book "Adoption Nation: How the Adoption Revolution is Transforming Our Families – and America." He also discussed his experiences as an adoptive father, among other topics. To hear the interview, go to: http://cbsloc.al/GQrQr9.

On March 29, Pertman was featured on the Patt Morrison Show on NPR in southern California. The discussion highlighted the recent trend and report by the Institute regarding openness in adoption and the fact that in the majority of infant adoptions these days there are relationships among all parties involved. To listen to the interview, go to: http://bit.ly/H2oqlY.

UPCOMING STAFF APPEARANCES
The following is a partial listing of upcoming appearances and/or presentations by Pertman and Institute senior staff. For a complete list, go to: http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/old/events/appearances.php. To inquire about Institute staff availability for speaking engagements, call 212-925-4089 or email info@adoptioninstitute.org.

  • April 10 – David Brodzinsky, the Institute's Research & Project Director, will present "Preparing Youth for Aging Out of Foster Care," a half-day workshop for child welfare professionals sponsored by the San Mateo County Department of Children and Family Services, San Mateo, CA. For more information and to register, go to: http://bit.ly/HbtiRh.
  • April 16 – The Adoption Institute and the Lesbian and Gay Center of New York will co-sponsor an evening event entitled "All Families Matter: A Conversation about Election Year Politics, LGBT Families and What's Good for Our Children." The featured speakers will be political strategist and CNN contributor, Hilary Rosen, and Institute Executive Director Adam Pertman. For more information, go to: http://bit.ly/GX52XH or email info@adoptioninstitute.org.
  • April 27 & 28– At the 33rd Annual American Adoption Congress Conference, taking place in Denver, Pertman will participate in a workshop, "Scams and Scruples: What Should We Do About Unethical Adoptions?" on the 27th; then, on the 28th, he will join a legislative panel discussion, "Dismantling the Barriers to Identity Access." For more information and to register, go to: http://bit.ly/H5819Y.

 

About the Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute

Since its establishment in 1996, the Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute has been a pre-eminent, independent voice for improving adoption for everyone it touches - particularly children - through innovative programs, educational initiatives, research and analysis, and advocacy for better practices, policies and laws.

Our award-winning web site, www.adoptioninstitute.org/old, is a popular and reliable source for accurate adoption information. Re-read our past e-Newsletters at: http://bit.ly/archivednewsletter.


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