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1. Law, Policy & Practice
- New U.S. – Russian Adoption Pact Mandates More Monitoring, Reporting
- U.S. Action Plan Seeks Family Care for World's Vulnerable Children
- Senate Roundtable Highlights Need for Post-Adoption Services
- Bill Would Diminish Immigrant Status as Factor in Foster Placements
- IRS Reports More than 100,000 Claims for Adoption Tax Credit for 2010
- Kazakhstan Suspends Adoptions to U.S., Continues Vetting Providers

2. Education & Advocacy
- Study Offers State Law Reform Blueprint for LGBT Families, Advocates
- Adoptee Coalition Provides Graphic on State Birth Certificate Access

3. Research
- Institute Invites Participation in Surveys on Intercountry Adoption
- International Adoptees Report More Phobias than Non-Adopted Peers
- Study Finds Higher Rate of Bullying Victims among Young Adoptees
- Analysis Connects Intercountry Adoption Decline, Surrogacy Boom
- Research Suggests Lower Stress for Adoptive Mothers of Adolescents

4. News
- Deported Immigrants Reportedly Struggle to Assert Parental Rights
- SC High Court Overturns Adoption, Citing Indian Child Welfare Act
- Tens of Thousands of Romanian Children Said to Stay in Orphanages
- Latino Families Increasingly Adopting Children from Foster Care
- Illegal Adoptions Alleged in Sierra Leone during Civil War in 1990s

5. Resources
- AFCARS 2011 Reports Drop in Foster Children Waiting to be Adopted
- Resource Center Study Examines Adoption’s Impact on Birthparents
- Adoption Triad Offers Search, Reunion Materials for Professionals
- Casey Foundation Publishes 23rd 'Kids Count' on Children's Status
- Report Assesses State Child Welfare System Indictors, Outcomes

6. From Our Partners
- Adoption Quarterly: Issue Features Articles on Transracial Adoption
- Adoption Today Focuses on Helping Families with School, Race Issues
- ALP Course – Adopted: The Identity Project – Features Adoptee Stories
- Spence-Chapin Offers Workshops for Families, Children in Fall 2012

7. Institute Update
- Mark Your Calendars for the Institute’s Upcoming Special Events!
- Your Support Can Help Us Conduct Our Groundbreaking Internet Study
- In The Media: Crying Babies, Post-Adoption Services . . . and More
- Upcoming Staff Appearances

 

Law, Policy & Practice

NEW U.S. – RUSSIAN ADOPTION PACT MANDATES MORE MONITORING, REPORTING
In July, the Russian Parliament approved – and President Putin signed – a bilateral agreement with the U.S. to strengthen adoption safeguards. According to a July 31 State Department Notice, the agreement will enter into force after both countries develop implementation procedures and exchange diplomatic notes. The U.S. Secretary of State and Russia's Foreign Minister signed the agreement last July. Among the changes it makes are that only Russian-authorized agencies will be allowed to provide services, and post-adoption monitoring and reporting will be strengthened. Russia has signed, but not ratified, the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption. There were 962 U.S. adoptions from Russia in 2011, down from a high of 5,862 in 2004. To read the State Department Notice, go to: http://1.usa.gov/PMF5f9; to read the Department’s FAQs on the agreement, go to: http://1.usa.gov/p9tQEv.

U.S. ACTION PLAN SEEKS FAMILY CARE FOR WORLD'S VULNERABLE CHILDREN
The U.S. Children in Adversity office released an Action Plan to ensure "all children grow up within protective family care and free from deprivation or danger" by incorporating the best interests of the child and internationally recognized evidence-based good practices. The PL 109-95 Secretariat, named for U.S Public Law 109-95, "The Assistance for Orphans and Other Vulnerable Children in Developing Countries Act of 2005," consulted with Congress and NGOs to develop the plan, released in July with rollout expected in September. A number of nonprofits, including the Adoption Institute, support the initiative; a public-private partnership, the Protecting the Future Alliance, will convene "to mobilize a variety of additional actors that will work together to reach critical protection and childhood development goals." To learn more, go to: http://bit.ly/RiDu1s and http://bit.ly/PM4R2Z.

SENATE ROUNDTABLE HIGHLIGHTS NEED FOR POST-ADOPTION SERVICES
In July, Senators Chuck Grassley (R-IA) and Mary Landrieu (D-LA) hosted a Senate Caucus on Foster Youth roundtable discussion on adoption disruption and policies to help ensure successful adoptions. The speakers included former foster youth; Dr. Richard Barth, Dean at the School of Social Work at the University of Maryland and an Institute Senior Fellow; and Dr. Nicholas Zill, a research psychologist and Child Trends founder. The discussion highlighted the need for comprehensive, post-adoption support services and recommendations such as: better training for adoptive parents and preparation for children and youth, improved data collection, funding to support research on interventions and best practices, and better health services to address the needs of children and families. To read the Adoption Institute’s latest report on post-adoption services, “Keeping the Promise,” go to: http://bit.ly/bQHfJz. To read the Institute’s past study on adoption stability and termination, "What's Working for Children," go to: http://bit.ly/NlDHSn.

BILL WOULD DIMINISH IMMIGRANT STATUS AS FACTOR IN FOSTER PLACEMENTS
The Help Separated Families Act of 2012 (HR6128) would provide that immigration status alone does not disqualify a parent, legal guardian or relative from having a foster child placed with them. It would also bar termination of parental rights' filings in foster care cases in which a fit and willing parent or guardian has been deported or is involved in an immigration proceeding. The bill was introduced by Rep. Roybal-Allard (D-CA) on July 13, has 10 cosponsors and was referred to the Committee on Ways and Means; there is no companion bill in the Senate. To read the bill and see its status, go to: http://1.usa.gov/iZaESp and search by bill number.

IRS REPORTS MORE THAN 100,000 CLAIMS FOR ADOPTION TAX CREDIT FOR 2010
The Internal Revenue Service received 101,627 adoption tax credit claims totaling $1.2 billion for 2010, the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration reported. Of processed claims filed through August 2011 (94,192), 4.5 percent ($49.3 million in adoption credits) did not have adequate documentation, and erroneous claims represented 1 percent (953 returns of $11 million in credits). The June 2012 report does not indicate what comparable figures were for other tax credits. "Processes to Address Erroneous Adoption Credits Result in Increased Taxpayer Burden and Credits Allowed to Non-qualifying Individuals" does not give the total amount of adoption tax credits that were refunded, but determined that over 300 valid claims were incorrectly suspended. The IRS is making changes to improve the review and refund process. The Adoption Institute is part of the Adoption Tax Credit Working Group, a coalition of scores of organizations working to preserve the federal adoption tax credit and its refund feature. To learn more about this effort, go to: http://bit.ly/NGgCmI; for more about the credit and the coalition, go to; http://bit.ly/K1B4ld. To read the report, go to: http://1.usa.gov/RhtkhH.

KAZAKHSTAN SUSPENDS ADOPTIONS TO U.S., CONTINUES VETTING PROVIDERS
An Aug. 21 U.S. State Department Alert, "Kazakhstan Suspends Intercountry Adoptions," reports that the country is instituting a "pause in adoption referrals," which "does not affect Kazakhstan’s ongoing process to authorize U.S. adoption service providers." The Department’s Special Advisor for Children’s Issues, Ambassador Susan Jacobs, met with Kazakh government officials to address their concerns and discussions will continue. A May State Department Notice reported that Hague Convention adoptions to the U.S. were initiated with Central Authority of Kazakhstan approval of two U.S. service providers. U.S. adoptions from Kazakhstan have ranged from a high of 835 in 2004 to 86 in 2011. To read the Alert, go to: http://1.usa.gov/NGtFqA.

 

Education & Advocacy

STUDY OFFERS STATE LAW REFORM BLUEPRINT FOR LGBT FAMILIES, ADVOCATES
"Securing Legal Ties for Children Living in LGBT Families: A State Strategy and Policy Guide" assesses state marriage and parenting laws affecting "non-traditional" families. The July 2012 study, published by the Movement Advancement Project, the Equality Federation Institute and Center for American Progress, in partnership with the Adoption Institute, provides a framework for policymakers to draft and amend laws to protect the rights of children in LGBT and other families. A July 20 New York Times article, "A Family with Two Moms, Except in the Eyes of the Law," by Tara Siegel Bernard, depicts the issues same-gender couples face in providing security for their families. To read the report, go to: http://bit.ly/Staxl6; to read the article, go to: http://nyti.ms/P4jXkz. To read the Institute’s latest report on adoption by gays and lesbians, “Expanding Resources for Children,” go to: http://bit.ly/neeNpc.

ADOPTEE COALITION PROVIDES GRAPHIC ON STATE BIRTH CERTIFICATE ACCESS
Laws governing adoptees' access to their original birth certificates (OBCs) are displayed by the Adoptee Rights Coalition in "Adoption Info-graphic: OBC Access by US States," a state-by-state analysis of OBC laws' features in each state, published on Aug. 14. To see the graphic, go to: http://bit.ly/REcFaA; to read the Adoption Institute’s latest report on the issue, go to: http://bit.ly/aJfgvk.

 

Research

INSTITUTE INVITES PARTICIPATION IN SURVEYS ON INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTION
The Adoption Institute is conducting a study, "Best Practices in Intercountry Adoption: Improving Children's Prospects for Living in Families," which includes online surveys of adoption professionals and parents who have adopted internationally and covers a range of policy and practice themes in "sending" and "receiving" countries. The project, which will inform policymakers and practitioners, aims to identify the critical issues affecting intercountry adoption practice, assess the impact of the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption and propose best practices, all within the guiding framework of the best interests of children and their families and in concert with the Hague Convention. If you are an adoption professional or parent of a child you adopted from another country, the Institute invites you to complete the appropriate survey: go to: http://bit.ly/Q4f38N (professionals) or http://bit.ly/O5PQr9 (parents).

INTERNATIONAL ADOPTEES REPORT MORE PHOBIAS THAN NON-ADOPTED PEERS
A Quebec-based study following 95 children who were internationally adopted (mean age at adoption=11 months) assessed the level of children's own reports of problems at age 7, as compared with non-adopted peers matched for similar socio-demographic characteristics; it found significant differences on only 1 of 7 problems – specific phobias. "Pre-Adoption Adversity and Self-Reported Behavior Problems in 7 Year-Old International Adoptees," by Noémi Gagnon-Oosterwaal, Louise Cossette, et al, is in the August issue of Child Psychiatry & Human Development (Volume 43, Issue 4). Thirty-three percent of the adopted children reported having phobias, compared to 7 percent of non-adopted children; this internalizing problem was associated with measures of pre-adoption adversity at arrival, particularly malnourishment. To read an abstract, go to: http://bit.ly/RDTD3Y.

STUDY FINDS HIGHER RATE OF BULLYING VICTIMS AMONG YOUNG ADOPTEES
A large national study of school bullying in Finland compared rates for victimization and being a bully among internationally adopted children and their peers, finding that victimization rates were higher for adoptees only among the youngest age group studied, 3rd-4th graders (25% vs. 18%), but not for 5th-9th graders. "Experiences of School Bullying Among Internationally Adopted Children: Results from the Finnish Adoption (FINADO) Study", by Hanna Raaska, Helena Lapinleimu, et al., is in the August issue of Child Psychiatry & Human Development (Volume 43, Issue 4). Children’s reports of bullying others were less common than for victimization – 8 percent among adoptees. Factors associated with greater victimization were: being male and Russian (as compared with Chinese origin), having disabilities, low social skills, learning difficulties, poor language skills and severe symptoms of RAD. To read an abstract, go to: http://bit.ly/OTEG6s.

ANALYSIS CONNECTS INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTION DECLINE, SURROGACY BOOM
“The Decline in Intercountry Adoptions and New Practices of Global Surrogacy: Global Exploitation and Human Rights Concerns,” by Karen Rotabi and Nicole Bromfield, presents an analysis of factors related to the global decline of intercountry adoption (by 50% since 2004) and the growth of global surrogacy in countries such as India and Guatemala. As the options for adopting infants via intercountry adoption have declined, some are turning to surrogacy as an alternative. The price of a surrogate birth in India is about $12,000 versus up to $70,000 in the U.S., and surrogacy has grown to a $445 million per year industry in India. The article, in the May issue of Affilia (Volume 27, Issue 2), discusses the need to address social justice issues since the surrogates are poor and oppressed, and there is a power divide between these women and the wealthy consumers of their service. Groups have begun to organize and address these issues in India but not in other countries, and policies need to be developed on an international level. To read an abstract, go to: http://bit.ly/OTERPc. To read the Adoption Institute's report on assisted reproductive technology, "Old Lessons for a New World," go to: http://bit.ly/O5Lw9G.

RESEARCH SUGGESTS LOWER STRESS FOR ADOPTIVE MOTHERS OF ADOLESCENTS
Spanish researchers compared self-reported stress levels of adoptive mothers of adolescents with a group of non-adoptive counterparts, using a community sample of 156 adoptive families and a comprehensive semi-structured questionnaire. They found the adoptive mothers had lower total stress scores than those in the non-adoptive group. "Stress in Adoptive Parents of Adolescents," by Yolanda Sánchez-Sandoval and Jesús Palacios, is in the July issue of Children and Youth Services Review (Volume 34, Issue 7). The predicting factors associated with maternal stress related to the child, the parent and the relationship between them, as well as the use of adoption-related support. The authors suggest stress is not always a negative, and access to support can create a higher capacity to handle adoption-related stress. To read an abstract, go to: http://bit.ly/RDUzW6.


Please go to the "From Our Partners" section to read the latest research from Adoption Quarterly.
 

News

DEPORTED IMMIGRANTS REPORTEDLY STRUGGLE TO ASSERT PARENTAL RIGHTS
An Aug. 25 Associated Press article by Helen O’Neill, "As thousands of parents are deported, US citizen kids face fallout; some placed for adoption," reports that "an unknown number" of children of deported illegal immigrants are placed for adoption and their parents "once deported, are often helpless to fight when a U.S. judge decides that their children are better off here." While an Immigration and Customs Enforcement spokesperson stated that parents decide "whether or not to relocate their children with them," immigration lawyers maintain – and recent cases demonstrate – that parents may not have access to resources and information to be able to make those choices. A number of articles report on individual deported immigrants’ parental rights’ cases in various states. To read the AP story, go to: http://wapo.st/PoC0PK. To read the other articles, go to: http://nbcnews.to/PdlxAS and http://bit.ly/Oocuyc. To read a commentary on the issue by the Adoption Institute’s Executive Director, Adam Pertman, go to: http://bit.ly/AnOOwm.

SC HIGH COURT OVERTURNS ADOPTION, CITING INDIAN CHILD WELFARE ACT
The South Carolina Supreme Court upheld the Indian Child Welfare Act in overturning a 2009 adoption by a non-native couple and placing a 2-year-old Cherokee girl with her biological father, reports an Indian Country Aug. 7 article, "South Carolina Supreme Court Rules to Keep Baby Veronica With Biological Father," by Alysa Landry. While the adoptive parents contended that the biological father did not fulfill parental responsibilities before or right after the child’s birth, he argued that though he surrendered his parental rights, he did not consent to the adoption. The decision held that "dictates of federal Indian law supersede state law where the adoption and custody of an Indian child is at issue." To read the article, go to: http://bit.ly/QU4l3J.

TENS OF THOUSANDS OF ROMANIAN CHILDREN SAID TO STAY IN ORPHANAGES
An Aug. 19 National Public Radio story, "For Romania's Orphans, Adoption is Still a Rarity," states that each year 700-900 children are adopted domestically, of the 1,200-1,400 "considered adoptable." Over 70,000 children live in orphanages in Romania, however, about the same total as 1989. While a new law was intended to facilitate domestic adoptions, it says children are only available if they have gone one year “without a parental relationship," which is not clearly defined. The story, by Meghan Collins Sullivan, cites a research project – the Bucharest Early Intervention Project – which found that "mental, physical and emotional issues that result from living in a non-family setting, such as anxiety and attachment disorders, have a much better chance of reversal if the child moves into a family setting before they turn 2." To read the article, go to: http://bit.ly/Snlu7C.

LATINO FAMILIES INCREASINGLY ADOPTING CHILDREN FROM FOSTER CARE
A July 31 NBC Latino story by Jacqueline Majia, "More Latinos are becoming foster parents or adopting, but need is still great," reports that a growing number of Latinos are adopting; data from the HHS Children’s Bureau show annual increases since 2002, to 15.5 percent of all adoptions in 2010. That year, 84,000 Latino children were in foster care and 11,000 were adopted. A number of research and advocacy groups, as well as adoption practitioners, are working to incorporate culturally competent services into recruitment efforts. To read the article, go to: http://nbcnews.to/OwPgWy.

ILLEGAL ADOPTIONS ALLEGED DURING CIVIL WAR IN SIERRA LEONE IN 1990S
A July 23 Voice Of America story, "Sierra Leone Parents Say Children Adopted Without Consent" by Nina DeVries, reports that an investigation into alleged illegal adoptions during Sierra Leone's 1990's civil war resulted in charges, including human trafficking, against adoption agency staff members. About 30 parents report that they left their children at the Help A Needy Child International Center to keep them safe during the war and that the Center contacted Maine Adoption Placement Services, which placed the children with U.S. parents. To read the article, go to: http://bit.ly/R2NL1O.

 

Resources

AFCARS 2011 REPORTS DROP IN FOSTER CHILDREN WAITING TO BE ADOPTED
The Children’s Bureau of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services published its FY2011 Adoption and Foster Care Analysis and Reporting System (AFCARS) Report in July. The report shows a decrease in the number of children in foster care waiting to be adopted, from 109,456 in 2010 to 104,236 in 2011. The number of children who were adopted, however, also fell – from 53,591 to 50,516 in those years. To read the report, go to: http://1.usa.gov/PP0eBf.

RESOURCE CENTER STUDY EXAMINES ADOPTION'S IMPACT ON BIRTHPARENTS
The National Resource Center for Permanency and Family Connections has published a study on the impact of voluntary relinquishment on birthparents throughout the adoption and post-adoption processes. To download the "Information Packet: Birth Parents in the Adoption Process: Experiences with Voluntary Relinquishment," go to: http://bit.ly/PpbmZX; to read the Adoption Institute’s report, "Safeguarding the Rights and Well-Being of Birthparents in the Adoption Process," go to: http://bit.ly/PNW5Qj.

ADOPTION TRIAD OFFERS SEARCH, REUNION MATERIALS FOR PROFESSIONALS
The July Adoption Triad, published by the Child Welfare Information Gateway, posts search and reunion resources for professionals, including a "Searching for Birth Relatives" factsheet, as well as other materials offered by states and adoption organizations. To read the e-brief, go to: http://1.usa.gov/RAmXZa.

CASEY FOUNDATION PUBLISHES 23RD 'KIDS COUNT' ON CHILDREN'S STATUS
The Annie E. Casey Foundation in July published its 23rd annual "KIDS COUNT Data Book," based on 16 well-being indicators and featuring national and state profiles on children’s family, social and economic status. To read the report, go to: http://bit.ly/R9AyGB.

REPORT ASSESSES STATE CHILD WELFARE SYSTEM INDICTORS, OUTCOMES
The Foundation for Government Accountability's "Right for Kids" evaluates state child welfare systems on 11 outcome areas and 41 data points, and determines that only 11 states take "less than 30 months on average to move a foster child to an adoptive home, and [have] a large number of adoptions as a share of the number of kids in foster care." To read the report, go to: http://bit.ly/Pq7p4m.

 

From Our Partners

ADOPTION QUARTERLY: ISSUE FEATURES ARTICLES ON TRANSRACIAL ADOPTION
"Family Trends and Transracial Adoption in the United States," by Cardell Jacobson, Leila Nielsen and Andrea Hardeman, uses data from the U.S. Census and the National Survey of Adoptive Parents to examine trends in transracial adoption in the U.S. This study, in the second 2012 issue of Adoption Quarterly (Volume 15, Issue 2), reports that the 18 percent of adopted children who are transracially adopted are most likely to be Asian (35%) or Hispanic (31%), and these adoptions are associated with higher parental income and education. Black children make up 11 percent of transracially adopted children, and these adoptions are not associated with higher parental income and education. (Twenty-three percent of transracially adopted children were categorized as "other.") Transracial adoption is more common among families where fathers had military service and less common in the South. To read an abstract, go to: http://bit.ly/MNmQ9G.

ADOPTION TODAY FOCUSES ON HELPING FAMILIES WITH SCHOOL, RACE ISSUES
Recognizing the unique needs of some children who have come to their families through adoption, Adoption Today has dedicated its August and September issues to helping families navigate the education system and traverse the waters of racial discrimination. From advice on making the most of parent-teacher conferences and tips on advocating for children with special needs, to ways to handle racial discrimination, both editions have something for every parent. Plus, don’t miss the Adoption Institute’s column on these subjects. For every subscription to Adoption Today, a donation is made to the Institute; to subscribe or read the issues, go to: www.adoptinfo.net.

ALP COURSE – ADOPTED: THE IDENTITY PROJECT – FEATURES ADOPTEE STORIES
Adoption Learning Partners is offering a course that guides parents through a series of adoptee stories, providing a unique view into the hearts, minds and souls of the adopted person’s experience. Through video and written stories, adult adoptees openly and honestly reflect on their experiences as children and teens, offering parents invaluable insights into what their children may be feeling. These stories are supported with clinical insights from experts offering practical tips for parents to use with their families. To register go to: http://bit.ly/Stfskt. To read the Adoption Institute’s report, "Beyond Culture Camp: Promoting Healthy Identity Formation in Adoption," go to: http://bit.ly/NTSbZP.

SPENCE-CHAPIN OFFERS WORKSHOPS FOR FAMILIES, CHILDREN IN FALL 2012
Starting in September, Spence-Chapin’s Adoption Resource Center (ARC) will present a number of workshops for adoptive families and children, including: Making an Adoption Lifebook on Sept. 22, Building Resilience in Your Child on Oct. 1 and Baby Basics on Dec. 3. These workshops are meant to strengthen bonds and prepare families for challenges in adoptive parenting and are open to anyone touched by adoption. Advance registration is required. To register, go to: http://bit.ly/FallWorkshops.

 

Institute Update

MARK YOUR CALENDARS FOR THE INSTITUTE'S UPCOMING SPECIAL EVENTS!
Friends and supporters: please save two dates on your autumn calendars. On the afternoon of Oct. 20, we will hold our annual Los Angeles-area event, Celebrating ... Our Families, Our Children, a "child-friendly" afternoon for families to attend together. An Institute supporter is graciously opening her storied home in the Hollywood Hills for the party; the house and grounds will offer wonderful space for fun activities for children and an inviting atmosphere for parents and other attendees to celebrate. More details to follow soon!

On Nov. 15 at Jazz at Lincoln Center, filmmaker and Adoption Institute Board member Greg Ammon will present the New York premier of his new documentary, 59 Middle Lane, exploring his search for family and identity. A panel discussion and performance by Wynton Marsalis and members of the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra will follow. For more information about either event, please contact Development Director, William Boltz, at wboltz@adoptioninstitute.org.

YOUR SUPPORT CAN HELP US CONDUCT OUR GROUNDBREAKING INTERNET STUDY Adoption Institute researchers are hard at work on a ground-breaking project examining how the internet is dramatically reshaping the world of adoption for everyone. Our initiative will provide the first-ever targeted, research-based recommendations and resources relating to ethics, best practices and safeguards. While we have already received generous contributions from concerned individuals and organizations, this project – extensive in scope and potential impact – requires more support. If you believe in the value of this work as much as we do, please send your check to The Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute, 120 East 38th Street, New York, NY 10016, and write "Internet Project" on the memo line, or make your contribution on our website at www.adoptioninstitute.org/old. To discuss funding for the project in more depth, please contact Development Director, William Boltz, at wboltz@adoptioninstitute.org or (212)925-4089.

IN THE MEDIA: CRYING BABIES, POST-ADOPTION SERVICES . . . AND MORE
In his latest offering on The Huffington Post, "Adoption in the Media: What Do Pregnant Women, Killers and Crying Babies Have in Common?" Executive Director Adam Pertman touches on several topics, commenting at one point: "Ah, welcome to the wonderful world of adoption, a place where women are baby-delivery devices for other parents, where men slay the people who raise them because they are not biologically related, and where the very idea of having entered a family in this way is so unnerving that it makes you weep." To read the Aug. 8 commentary, go to: http://huff.to/TyWrfX.

In an NPR interview on Aug. 7 discussing the decline in international adoptions, Executive Director Pertman stated that boys and girls without families are the ones disadvantaged by delayed processes, noting “We know that orphanage life, institutional care, diminishes children.” To read the article or listen to the story, go to: http://n.pr/RymGEY.

Pertman cited tight state budgets for the lack of robust post-adoption services in an Aug. 28 NPR story, “Helping Foster Kids Even After Adoption,” and advocated for a change in approach from child placement to a process requiring support and services for family success. To read the article, go to: http://n.pr/NZ5Tq2. To read the Adoption Institute’s report on post-adoption services, “Keeping the Promise,” go to: http://bit.ly/SNY61W.

The Aug. 14 Wall Street Journal and July 29 Salt Lake Tribune editions ran stories, "One Baby, Two Moms: a Rise in Open Adoption" and "Open adoption is norm; should arrangements be enforced?" referencing the Institute’s recent report entitled "Openness in Adoption: From Secrecy and Stigma to Knowledge and Connections." To read the articles, go to: http://bit.ly/R2N5JV and http://on.wsj.com/OimqGG. To read the Institute’s report, go to: http://bit.ly/PP56Gy.

A July 25 Psychology Today article, "Single Gay and Heterosexual Men Choose Fatherhood" quotes Pertman as saying it remains tougher for a single man to adopt. To read the article, go to: http://bit.ly/TvDo6k. To read the Adoption Institute’s study "Expanding Resources for Children III: Research-based Best Practices in Adoption by Gays and Lesbians," go to: http://bit.ly/MQ6myN.

In an Aug. 19 Huffington Post "Post 50" interview by Ann Brenoff, "Too Old to Adopt? Not The Case For These Parents," Pertman discusses the growing trend of adoptive parents in their 50’s and 60’s. To read the article, go to: http://huff.to/Sc28Oy.

UPCOMING STAFF APPEARANCES
The following is a partial listing of upcoming appearances and/or presentations by Pertman and Institute senior staff. For a complete list, go to: http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/old/events/appearances.php. To inquire about Institute staff availability for speaking engagements, call 212-925-4089 or email info@adoptioninstitute.org.

  • September 22 – Dr. Jeanne Howard, the Institute’s Policy & Research Director, and Susan Smith, Program & Project Director, will teach a one-day course entitled "Central Elements of Preserving Placements" as a part of Portland State University's Advanced Training in Therapy with Adoptive and Foster Families program. The course will be held in Portland, OR, from 8:30 a.m. to 5 pm, offers 7 CEUs and is open to those attending through distance learning. For more information and to register, go to: http://bit.ly/MD9UzJ.

  • October 12 – Executive Director Adam Pertman will be the keynote speaker at EDGY, a one-day conference that focuses on best practices for professionals who work with GLBTQ youth and families. He will also present “A Revolution in the Family: Adoption in the GLBTQ Community” during a breakout session. The event will be at the University of Southern California Tutor Hall. For more information and to register, go to: http://bit.ly/PFHLLp

  • October 18– Pertman will give a plenary presentation at the American Academy of Adoption Attorneys’ conference, “The Future of Adoption in America.” The two-day event will be held in Salt Lake City, UT. For more information and to register, go to: http://bit.ly/ST6x9m.

 

About the Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute

Since its establishment in 1996, the Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute has been a pre-eminent, independent voice for improving adoption for everyone it touches – particularly children – through innovative programs, educational initiatives, research and analysis, and advocacy for better practices, policies and laws.

Our award-winning web site, www.adoptioninstitute.org/old, is a popular and reliable source for accurate adoption information. Re-read our past e-Newsletters at: http://bit.ly/archivednewsletter.


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