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1. Law, Policy & Practice
- CA Legislation Provides Protections in Immigrant Child Welfare Cases
- Haiti Plans to Implement New Adoption Procedures Starting in October
- House Passes Bill to Facilitate Adoption of North Korean Children

2. Education & Advocacy
- Institute and NACAC Initiative: The Vital Role of Adoption Subsidies
- Senate Bill Would Make Adoption Tax Credit Permanent and Refundable
- Professionals, Parents Asked to Participate in Intercountry Surveys
- 'Keeping the Promise' Recommendations Disseminated at Federal Summit
- Institute Supports Children’s Mental Health Accessibility Act

3. Research
- Evaluation Shows GA ‘Roundtables’ Strategy Helps Achieve Permanency
- Study Finds Feelings about Adoption and Ethnicity Impact Self-Esteem
- Analysis Shows Permanency Affected by Agency, Court Interactions
- Research: Maternal Sensitivity Predicts Infant and Teen Attachment

4. News
- Cambodia, with New Regulations in Place, to Resume Adoptions in 2013
- Suit Alleges Michigan Withheld Information from Adoptive Parents
- Ruling on Indian Child Welfare Act Appealed to U.S. Supreme Court

5. Resources
- Outcomes Report Shows Few States Achieve Timely Adoptions from Care
- New Publication: ‘Pediatrician’s Role in Supporting Adoptive Families’
- Fact Sheet Offers Help to Families on Adoption-Competent Therapists
- Resource Center Offers Guide on Social Media in Child Welfare Work

6. From Our Partners
- Adoption Quarterly: Articles on Aspects of Transracial Adoption
- Adoption Today Focuses on Increasing Number of Older Child Adoptions
- ALP Offers Webinar, 'FASD: Risk, Development and Intervention'
- Spence-Chapin Offers Workshops for Families, Children in October

7. Institute Update
- You're Invited: Oct. 20 Celebrating ... Our Families, Our Children in L.A.
- Board Member’s Documentary Premiere to Benefit Adoption Institute
- In The Media: Investing in Our Kids, the Role of Doctors in Adoption
- Upcoming Staff Appearances

 

Law, Policy & Practice

CA LEGISLATION PROVIDES PROTECTIONS IN IMMIGRANT CHILD WELFARE CASES
The California legislature passed, and sent to the governor for signature on Sept. 6, a bill (SB 1064) that provides family and custodial protections for children of immigrant families. The legislation’s provisions include: allowing courts to provide extensions for family reunification periods to enable more diligent searches for parents who may be detained or deported, or identify a relative placement; affirming that immigration status in itself is not a disqualifying factor in assessing relative (including parent) placements; and mandating the state to provide guidance to social workers on making referrals for children eligible for protective status. To read the bill, go to: http://1.usa.gov/URrgy1. To read a commentary by the Adoption Institute’s Executive Director, “Immigration and Shattered Families,” go to: http://bit.ly/QAJAu8.

HAITI PLANS TO IMPLEMENT NEW ADOPTION PROCEDURES STARTING IN OCTOBER
A Sept. 14 U.S. State Department Notice, “Haiti Announces New Adoption Procedures,” reports that new administrative adoption procedures in that country will be effective Oct. 1. According to the Notice, an authorization process will be required for orphanages, as well as for adoption service providers, while mandating that families engage authorized providers. Haiti’s adoption authority told the U.S. government that it will process cases submitted before May 7, 2012 under the old procedures, and is considering doing so for cases filed through Sept. 15. In May, Haiti temporarily suspended processing new adoption cases to "expedite processing on its backlog of pending cases and begin internal restructuring to bring it closer to international standards," though it has not ratified the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption. Haiti has worked to ensure children available for adoption after the January 2010 earthquake are legal orphans. To read the State Department Notice, go to: http://1.usa.gov/VEtbWa; to read the Adoption Institute's statement on the earthquake and adoption from Haiti, go to: http://bit.ly/dcnxyZ.

HOUSE PASSES BILL TO FACILITATE ADOPTION OF NORTH KOREAN CHILDREN
On Sept. 11, the House passed the North Korean Refugee Adoption Act of 2012 (HR1464), which would require the Secretary of State and Secretary of Homeland Security to "develop a comprehensive strategy for facilitating the adoption of North Korean children by United States citizens." In describing the basis for the legislation, the Sense of Congress says that "thousands of North Korean children do not have families and are threatened with starvation and disease if they remain in North Korea or as stateless refugees in surrounding countries; thousands of United States citizens would welcome the opportunity to adopt North Korean orphans living outside North Korea as de jure or de facto stateless refugees" and adds that the U.S. "should make every effort to facilitate the immediate care, family reunification, and, if necessary and appropriate, the adoption of any eligible North Korean children." The Senate companion bill, S416, was referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations. Organizations such as the Korea Policy Institute oppose the bill, finding it lacks adequate safeguards and requirements for adherence to established international standards. To read the bill and see its status, go to: http://1.usa.gov/iZaESp and search by bill number; to read the Korea Policy Institute’s position, go to: http://bit.ly/b4jos6.

 

Education & Advocacy

INSTITUTE AND NACAC INITIATIVE: THE VITAL ROLE OF ADOPTION SUBSIDIES
As part of its "Keeping the Promise" initiative, the Adoption Institute is launching a nationwide effort – in partnership with the North American Council on Adoptable Children (NACAC) – to preserve an essential tool for enabling children and youth to move from foster care into permanent, loving, successful families: state funding for adoption subsidies. When states experience budget shortfalls, they often decrease child welfare spending, including by limiting adoption subsidy amounts and/or restricting eligibility. To counter this trend, the Adoption Institute and NACAC have created advocacy materials for parents and professionals to use at the state level, including an Issue Brief and state data resources to supplement national information. We also are seeking feedback from advocates about the specific need for adoption subsidies in their states and any proposed limits to those subsidies, as well as experiences educating lawmakers’ offices. To learn more, download resources and provide input, go to: http://bit.ly/TBMgeo. To read a Huffington Post commentary on the issue, go to: http://huff.to/SjC03p.

SENATE BILL WOULD MAKE ADOPTION TAX CREDIT PERMANENT AND REFUNDABLE
Senators Landrieu (D-LA), Blunt (R-MO), Hutchison (R-TX) and Cardin (D-MD) introduced S3616, the companion bill to HR4373, the Making Adoption Affordable Act, on Sept. 21. The bill would increase the tax credit to $13,170 and make it permanent and refundable, beginning in tax year 2012. Without new legislation, the current $12,650 credit will not be refundable for 2012 and will expire at year-end; in 2013, only those adopting children with special needs would be eligible for $6,000 in qualifying expenses. According to the North American Council on Adoptable Children, the adoption tax credit is likely to be included in a tax credit package Congress will take up after the November election, but it is uncertain whether Congress will include the refundability provision.

To support this effort, call your Senators and Representative and urge them to co-sponsor the Making Adoption Affordable Act. To find your Senators’ names, go to: http://1.usa.gov/3UAs, for Representatives go to: http://1.usa.gov/prsjAl and enter your zip code. Call 202-225-3121 and ask for his/her office (you will need to make separate calls for each office). Tell the child welfare/tax staffer that you are a constituent (provide your mailing address if leaving a message) and encourage your legislators to co-sponsor S3616/HR4373. (To see if your Representative is already a cosponsor, go to: http://bit.ly/Lj5v7L.) For background information about the credit and for talking points for your calls, go to: http://bit.ly/IKEMeC.

PROFESSIONALS, PARENTS ASKED TO PARTICIPATE IN INTERCOUNTRY SURVEYS
The Adoption Institute is conducting a study, "Best Practices in Intercountry Adoption: Improving Children's Prospects for Living in Families," which includes two online surveys –– one of adoption professionals and another of parents who have adopted internationally –– that cover a range of policy and practice themes in "sending" and "receiving" countries. The project, which will inform policymakers and practitioners, aims to identify the critical issues affecting intercountry adoption practice, assess the impact of the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption and propose best practices, all within the guiding framework of the best interests of children and their families and in concert with the Hague Convention. If you are an adoption professional or parent of a child you adopted from another country, the Institute invites you to complete the appropriate survey: go to: http://bit.ly/Q4f38N (professionals) or http://bit.ly/O5PQr9 (parents).

'KEEPING THE PROMISE' RECOMMENDATIONS DISSEMINATED AT FEDERAL SUMMIT
Voice for Adoption shared post-adoption services policy recommendations from the Institute’s "Keeping The Promise" report at a late-August Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) summit considering prevention and intervention to improve the mental and behavioral health of adopted children. Researchers, practitioners, policymakers, youth and families discussed topics including the need for improvements in: data, dissemination of research and best practice tools to the field and adoptive families, adoption competent mental health services, access and payment for appropriate services, and federal policy and funding. The summit was a collaboration among several federal agencies – SAMHSA, the National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Drug Abuse, National Institute of Mental Health and the Administration on Children, Youth and Families (ACYF) – that will now identify short- and long-term goals and strategies to meet them. To read "Keeping The Promise," go to: http://bit.ly/bQHfJz.

INSTITUTE SUPPORTS CHILDREN’S MENTAL HEALTH ACCESSIBILITY ACT
The Adoption Institute signed on to a coalition letter to Senators Kerry (D-MA) and Grassley (R-IA) in support of the Children’s Mental Health Accessibility Act (S3289) to ensure children and youth have access to comprehensive home- and community-based mental health services they require to effectively address their individual behavioral needs and avoid institutional care. The legislation would make permanent a nine-state, five-year demonstration project that has shown home-based interventions average one-third the cost of institutional ones. The bill has five cosponsors and was referred to the Finance Committee; there is no companion bill yet in the House. To read the bill and see its status, go to: http://1.usa.gov/iZaESp and search by bill number.

 

Research

EVALUATION SHOWS GA 'ROUNDTABLES' STRATEGY HELPS ACHIEVE PERMANENCY
Permanency roundtables, a strategy developed and tested collaboratively by Casey Family Programs and the Georgia Department of Family and Children’s Services, was piloted on approximately 500 cases of youth who had been in care over four years on average, with 31 percent of youth achieving permanency within 12 months (9.1% adopted, 13.3% guardianship and 8.3% reunification). "The Impact of Roundtables on Permanency for Youth in Foster Care," by Kirk O’Brien, Cynthia Davis, et al., in the September issue of Children and Youth Services Review (Volume 34, Issue 9), presents findings of the evaluation. The structured team roundtables that identified barriers and brainstormed strategies to address them ultimately were implemented statewide, and led to systemic solutions beyond case-level actions. The authors recommend sustaining aggressive casework until permanency is achieved. To read an abstract, go to: http://bit.ly/OY6do1.

STUDY FINDS FEELINGS ABOUT ADOPTION AND ETHNICITY IMPACT SELF-ESTEEM
A study of 224 teen girls who were adopted from China (97% transracially, 88% adopted under age 2) showed that their feelings about adoption and ethnic socialization play an important role in self-esteem. The research found that positive feelings about adoption, ethnic identification, fewer feelings of ethnic marginality and higher academic functioning all predicted higher self-esteem. "Adopted Chinese Girls Come of Age: Feelings about Adoption, Ethnic Identity, Academic Functioning, and Global Self-Esteem," by Tony Tan and Brittany Jordan-Arthur, is in the August issue of Children and Youth Services Review (Volume 34, Issue 8). The authors stressed the importance of adoptive parents helping these youth to feel positively about their adoptions and instilling a sense of ethnic pride in order to reduce feelings of marginality and promote self-esteem. To read an abstract, go to: http://bit.ly/OPnsO4. To read the Institute’s report on the subject, "Beyond Culture Camp," go to: http://bit.ly/1C1m7Z.

ANALYSIS SHOWS PERMANENCY AFFECTED BY AGENCY, COURT INTERACTIONS
Using data from Washington State’s child welfare system in a multivariate competing risks analysis, researchers identified that geography played a key role in youth achieving legal permanency. Much of the variation in permanency outcomes across regions of the state appeared to result from some jurisdictions being more likely than others to place older youth with problem behavior into the child welfare system. "Timing of Exits to Legal Permanency from Out-of-Home Care: The Importance of Systems and Implications for Assessing Institutional Accountability," by Mark Courtney and Jennifer Hook, is in the December issue of Children and Youth Services Review (Volume 34, Issue 12). The findings have implications for understanding how troubled youth are engaged in the child welfare system and how juvenile courts influence the timing of exits from out-of-home care placements. Additionally, collecting and sharing this data offers the possibility of creating accountability, informed policy development and targeted practice improvements. To read an abstract, go to: http://bit.ly/RXrPlf. To read the Adoption Institute’s report, "Never Too Old," go to: http://bit.ly/rkZJVP.

RESEARCH: MATERNAL SENSITIVITY PREDICTS INFANT AND TEEN ATTACHMENT
A Dutch longitudinal study of 125 adolescents adopted in early infancy assessed attachment and maternal sensitive support at 12 months and at age 14, finding that greater maternal sensitive support predicted secure attachment at both periods. "Remaining or Becoming Secure: Parental Sensitive Support Predicts Attachment Continuity from Infancy to Adolescence in a Longitudinal Adoption Study," by Marielle Beijersbergen, Femmie Juffer, et al., is in the September issue of Developmental Psychology (Volume 48, Issue 5). Overall, 76 percent were rated as securely attached as infants, but only 39 percent as teens (based on the Adult Attachment Interview). To read an abstract, go to: http://bit.ly/OY5OSy.

Please go to the "From Our Partners" section to read the latest research from Adoption Quarterly.

 

News

CAMBODIA, WITH NEW REGULATIONS IN PLACE, TO RESUME ADOPTIONS IN 2013
While Cambodia maintains that new regulations bring its international adoption system into compliance with the 1993 Hague Convention, one provision allows the adoption of children in orphanages, raising concerns that some whose parents are still living will be included, reports a Sept. 19 GlobalPost.com article in the Alaska Dispatch. According to "Cambodia's baby-stealing problem, can it be solved?" by Denise Hruby, the country’s Ministry of Social Affairs reports that of the 12,000 children now in orphanages, around 9,000 have at least one living parent. Starting on Jan. 1, 2013, Cambodia will accept applications for international adoption, lifting the ban it imposed in 2009 in response to accusations of fraud and corruption. A U.S. Embassy spokesperson said it would track developments; the U.S. instituted a ban on adoptions from Cambodia in 2001. To read the article, go to: http://bit.ly/SDZ1hM.

SUIT ALLEGES MICHIGAN WITHHELD INFORMATION FROM ADOPTIVE PARENTS
A Sept. 13 CBS Detroit article, "Parents Sue Mich. DHS For Adoption Fraud," reports that several Michigan adoptive families filed a complaint against the state because officials "routinely withheld medical records and information about financial subsidies for special-needs children, misled prospective adoptive parents about their rights and stonewalled their attempts to seek assistance." The suit, filed in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan, claims that the parents' civil rights were violated by the Department of Human Services and adoption agencies. To read the article, go to: http://cbsloc.al/PluNQi. To read an article about allegations that Florida did not disclose children’s histories to adoptive parents, go to: http://fcnews.tv/PocZEg.

RULING ON INDIAN CHILD WELFARE ACT APPEALED TO U.S. SUPREME COURT
According to a Sept. 13 Associated Press article, "Indian child case appealed to the US Supreme Court," the South Carolina Supreme Court decision upholding the Indian Child Welfare Act is being appealed to the United States Supreme Court. In July, the state’s high court overturned a 2009 adoption by a non-native couple and placed a 2-year-old Cherokee girl with her biological father, reported an Indian Country Aug. 7 article, "South Carolina Supreme Court Rules to Keep Baby Veronica With Biological Father," by Alysa Landry. The decision held that "dictates of federal Indian law supersede state law where the adoption and custody of an Indian child is at issue." To read the AP article, go to: http://bit.ly/QQC1Nu; to read the Indian Country article, go to: http://bit.ly/QU4l3J.

 

Resources

OUTCOMES REPORT SHOWS FEW STATES ACHIEVE TIMELY ADOPTIONS FROM CARE
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services this month issued Child Welfare Outcomes 2007–2010: Report to Congress, which provides national and state performance outcomes for children in the child welfare system as evaluated through the Child and Youth Services Reviews. It finds that achieving timely adoptions remains a challenge: only four states (Utah, Iowa, North Dakota and Colorado) were found to have over half of adoptions in 2010 occurring in less than 24 months from the time the child entered foster care. To read the report, go to: http://1.usa.gov/OQgdW4; to view data on an interactive website, go to: http://1.usa.gov/PBTqtV.

NEW PUBLICATION: 'PEDIATRICIAN'S ROLE IN SUPPORTING ADOPTIVE FAMILIES'
The American Academy of Pediatrics this month released on its website "The Pediatrician's Role in Supporting Adoptive Families," (also published in the October 2012 issue of Pediatrics). "Children who join families through adoption," the report notes, "can have unique medical, educational, developmental or behavioral issues, and it is important for both pediatricians and families to be aware of the psychological challenges that many adopted children experience." To read the report, go to: http://bit.ly/QzYkqj.

FACT SHEET OFFERS HELP TO FAMILIES ON ADOPTION-COMPETENT THERAPISTS
The Child Welfare Information Gateway recently issued an updated fact sheet for adoptive families, "Selecting and Working with a Therapist Skilled in Adoption" that describes different types of therapy and mental health providers and offers suggestions on how to find an appropriate therapist. To read this resource, go to: http://1.usa.gov/OQgo3B.

RESOURCE CENTER OFFERS GUIDE ON SOCIAL MEDIA IN CHILD WELFARE WORK
The National Resource Center for Child Welfare Data and Technology recently published a guide, "Social Media for Child Welfare Resource Guide," that includes information on strategies and tools for using social media in child welfare work and examples of social media policies and security resources. To read the guide, go to: http://bit.ly/UmUaHO.

 

From Our Partners

ADOPTION QUARTERLY: ARTICLES ON ASPECTS OF TRANSRACIAL ADOPTION
“Resolving Race: How Adoptive Parents Discuss Choosing the Race of their Child,” by Miriam Klevan, is a qualitative study of the resolution of race-based adoption choices among 34 adoptive parents; it is in the April-June issue (Volume 15, Issue 2). Of the 18 adopting transracially, nine were unresolved in relation to race, as evidenced by struggles to cope with prejudice and racial difference, difficulties discussing race, a sense of identity threat or a lack of comfort or competence with their children’s birth culture. The author concludes that considering the implications of race during the decision-making process is important and recommends training. To read an abstract, go to: http://bit.ly/Swd5da.

"'It Was Like This, I Think': Constructing an Adoption Narrative for Chinese Adopted Children," by April Chatham-Carpenter in the current issue (Volume 15, Issue 3), analyzed the adoption narratives told by 35 parents to their children. The parents portrayed Chinese birthparents in a positive light, often describing them as victims of a larger situation outside their control. The researcher identified themes in children’s questions (demographics and characteristics of the birth family, the birthmother’s thoughts and feelings, abandonment, early days of life and the future) and how parents attempted to address these. To read an abstract, go to: http://bit.ly/OVtYOZ.

ADOPTION TODAY FOCUSES ON INCREASING NUMBER OF OLDER CHILD ADOPTIONS
As more families turn to older child and special needs adoption, they require information on how to prepare and what to expect. Adoption Today's October issue features Donnie Kanter Winokur sharing the incredible effect a service dog makes in the life of her Fetal Alcohol Syndrome impacted son and Sarah Perkins discussing the joys of parenting a son who joined her family at age 5. This issue will help you prepare for welcoming an older child into your fold and includes the Adoption Institute’s column on adoption subsidies for families adopting children from foster care. To subscribe or read, go to: www.adoptinfo.net; for every subscription to Adoption Today, a donation is made to the Institute. To read the Adoption Institute’s report, "Never Too Old," go to: http://bit.ly/rkZJVP.

ALP OFFERS WEBINAR, 'FASD: RISK, DEVELOPMENT AND INTERVENTION'
Join Dr. Ira Chasnoff on Thursday, Nov. 8, at 7 p.m. (Central) as he helps parents sort through possible complications when raising a child who was exposed to drugs or alcohol before birth. Dr. Chasnoff will explain the physical and developmental impact of prenatal substance exposure on children as they grow. He also will offer practical intervention strategies that parents can use to help their child develop to their maximum potential and will answer questions beginning at 8 p.m. To register, go to: http://bit.ly/UzjTLG.

SPENCE-CHAPIN OFFERS WORKSHOPS FOR FAMILIES, CHILDREN IN OCTOBER
Spence-Chapin will present a number of workshops and presentations for adoptive families and children in October, including: Building Resilience in Your Child on Oct. 1; Pursuing Fertility and Adoption on Oct. 10; Child Development and International Adoption on Oct. 15; and Adoption + Teens = Complicated on Oct. 22. These workshops are meant to educate and prepare families for adoptive parenting and are open to anyone touched by adoption. For more information and to register, go to: http://bit.ly/7qIbv7.

 

Institute Update

YOU'RE INVITED: OCT. 20 CELEBRATING ... OUR FAMILIES, OUR CHILDREN IN L.A.
Please attend our annual West Coast benefit, Celebrating ... Our Families, Our Children on October 20 if you can –– and please support the event financially even if you cannot make it. The afternoon will be an opportunity for family fun, a chance to renew friendships and, most importantly, to raise awareness and funding for the Adoption Institute. We are thrilled to be honoring Ame Austin, longtime Institute supporter, and Max Studio, our corporate honoree, as well as Children’s Action Network as our Spotlight Award recipient for its work for waiting boys and girls –– including its sponsorship of "Home for the Holidays," which focuses attention on finding families for children in foster care. A legendary home and grounds in the Hollywood Hills will offer wonderful space for fun children’s activities and an inviting atmosphere for parents to celebrate. To view the invitation, go to: http://bit.ly/TvNiIL; for additional details or to make a donation, please contact Development Director William Boltz at [email protected].

BOARD MEMBER'S DOCUMENTARY PREMIERE TO BENEFIT ADOPTION INSTITUTE On November 15, filmmaker and Adoption Institute Board member Greg Ammon will present the New York City premiere of his new documentary, 59 Middle Lane. The film is an exploration of Greg’s search for family and identity. A discussion featuring Institute Executive Director Adam Pertman and a performance by Wynton Marsalis and members of the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra will follow. To buy tickets for what promises to be a most memorable evening, or if you have questions, please contact Development Director William Boltz at (212) 925-4089 or [email protected].

IN THE MEDIA: INVESTING IN OUR KIDS, THE ROLE OF DOCTORS IN ADOPTION
Executive Director Adam Pertman and Policy & Legislation Director Georgia Deoudes discuss the need to maintain adequate state adoption subsidies in a Sept. 25 Huffington Post article entitled "Adoption Subsidies: A Great Investment for Kids Who Need Families." They note that over 104,000 children are in foster care awaiting adoption. In a recent study, a vast majority of parents stated that subsidies were an important factor in their decision to adopt, while over half of those parents said that they simply could not afford to adopt without the subsidies. The Institute is partnering with NACAC on a campaign to raise awareness of the importance of these subsidies. To read the article, go to: http://huff.to/RhtYve.

On September 27, Pertman was featured on "The Joy Cardin Show" on Wisconsin Public Radio. The lively discussion centered on the report issued this week by the American Academy of Pediatrics, which focused on helping parents and professionals address issues in adoptive families. To listen to the interview, go to: http://bit.ly/QI0QL8.

UPCOMING STAFF APPEARANCES
The following is a partial listing of upcoming appearances and/or presentations by Pertman and Institute senior staff. For a complete list, go to: http://bit.ly/bPNVDc. To inquire about Institute staff availability for speaking engagements, call 212-925-4089 or email [email protected].

  • October 12 – Executive Director Adam Pertman will be the keynote speaker at EDGY, a one-day conference that focuses on best practices for professionals who work with GLBTQ youth and families. He will also present "A Revolution in the Family: Adoption in the GLBTQ Community" during a breakout session. The event will be at the University of Southern California Tutor Hall. To learn more and to register, go to: http://bit.ly/PFHLLp.

  • October 18 – Pertman will give a plenary presentation at the American Academy of Adoption Attorneys' conference, "The Future of Adoption in America." The two-day event will be held in Salt Lake City, UT. For more information and to register, go to: http://bit.ly/ST6x9m.

  • November 9 – Pertman will present "Rethinking Adoption in the 21st Century" during his keynote address at Adopt Salon’s Conference in Los Angeles, CA. To learn more and to register for the conference, go to: http://bit.ly/OpQfZB.

  • November 17 – Research & Project Director David Brodzinsky will conduct a presentation for C.A.S.E. on “The Inner World of Adopted Children: Implications for Adoption Communication” in Chevy Chase, MD. For more information and to register, go to: www.adoptionsupport.org.

 

About the Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute

Since its establishment in 1996, the Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute has been a pre-eminent, independent voice for improving adoption for everyone it touches – particularly children – through innovative programs, educational initiatives, research and analysis, and advocacy for better practices, policies and laws.

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