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EDITOR'S NOTE: The December and January issues of the Institute newsletter will be combined and published on January 31, 2013.

SPECIAL NEWS: We’re updating our name to The Donaldson Adoption Institute, and will be asking for your input on ways to improve our work and its impact; stay tuned for details in January. Meanwhile, we wish you a warm and joyous holiday season!

1. Law, Policy & Practice
- Obama, Marking Adoption Month, Focuses on 'All Qualified' Caregivers
- Legislation Would Require Accreditation for All Intercountry Providers
- U.S. State Department Hosts Program on Intercountry Adoption Issues
- Utah Supreme Court Rules in Favor of Birthfather in Registry Filing Case

2. Education & Advocacy
- Institute, Partners Work to Preserve Federal Tax Credit Beyond 2012

3. Research
- Research Shows Self-Determination is Vital for Transition from Care
- Study Examines Factors Related to Positive Outcomes for Foster Youth
- Analysis Finds Adoption Effective for Children’s Emotional Development
- Workers in Three Countries Cite Similar Reasons for Adoptive Placement

4. News
- Washington State Reportedly Asks Families to Reduce Adoption Assistance
- MI Bills Would Allow Agencies to Deny Applicants for Religious Reasons
- NC Judge Orders Return of Three American-Born Boys to Deported Father
- U.N. Children’s Rights Panel Seeks to Bar Use of 'Baby Boxes' in Europe

5. Resources
- Coalition Provides Report on Guardianship Assistance Implementation
- Publication Summarizes Laws on Adoption Advertising, Intermediaries
- Chart Examines Potential Impact of 'Fiscal Cliff' on Family Programs

6. From Our Partners
- Adoption Quarterly: Putative Father Registries Raise Ethical Issues
- ALP Offers Webinar in January on Raising Children with Special Needs
- Spence-Chapin Offers Informational Workshops and Webinar
- Adoption Today Features Families Who Help Orphans and Poor Children

7. Institute Update
- Annual Report Highlights Institute Activities, Research and Results
- Welcome to our Newest Senior Fellow, Esteemed Researcher Penny Maza
- Remember the Institute for Your Holiday Gift List and in Tax Planning
- In the Media: The Internet’s Role, Christian Adoptions, a Webinar and More
- Upcoming Staff Appearances

 

Law, Policy & Practice

OBAMA, MARKING ADOPTION MONTH, FOCUSES ON 'ALL QUALIFIED' CAREGIVERS
The White House issued a Presidential Proclamation on Nov. 1 in recognition of National Adoption Month 2012. President Obama asked the country "to eliminate discriminatory barriers that would separate foster children from a loving family," noting "it is essential that all qualified adults have the opportunity to care for a child in need." He also said this month provides the opportunity to "recommit to providing every child with the care and security that will nurture their development and well-being." To read the proclamation, go to: http://1.usa.gov/U9sQJT. To read the Adoption Institute’s reports, "Expanding Resources for Children III: Research-Based Best Practices in Adoption by Gays and Lesbians" and "Finding Families for African American Children: The Role Of Race & Law in Adoption from Foster Care," go to: http://bit.ly/VdVpKF and http://bit.ly/U2D7Fr.

LEGISLATION WOULD REQUIRE ACCREDITATION FOR ALL INTERCOUNTRY PROVIDERS
The Senate version of the Intercountry Adoption Universal Accreditation Act of 2012 (S3331/HR6027), which would require all adoption service providers to be accredited even if they provide services in connection with children from countries not party to the 1993 Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption, was placed on the Senate calendar on Nov. 14. It was favorably reported by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. The House companion bill was referred to the Committee on Foreign Affairs in June. The second session of the 112th Congress is scheduled to conclude on Dec. 14; if Congress does not pass the legislation, it will have to be reintroduced in the 113th Congress in January. To read the bill and learn its status, go to: http://1.usa.gov/V5LvXA and search by bill number.

U.S. STATE DEPARTMENT HOSTS PROGRAM ON INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTION ISSUES
On Nov. 20, the U.S. State Department hosted a program on intercountry adoption featuring Ambassador Susan Jacobs, Special Advisor for Children's Issues; Richard Klarberg, President and CEO of the Council on Accreditation; and Christine James-Brown, President and CEO of the Child Welfare League of America. The panel was part of the public forum series "Conversations with America" and covered topics including selecting an adoption service provider and understanding the adoption process, as well as "challenges and opportunities to improve the inter-country adoption process, and how the role of accreditation promotes best practices." To view the program, go to: http://1.usa.gov/To89cr.

UTAH SUPREME COURT RULES IN FAVOR OF BIRTHFATHER IN REGISTRY FILING CASE
A Nov. 27 Utah Supreme Court decision found a lower court’s reading of the state’s Adoption Act "poses an unacceptable risk of erroneous deprivation of unwed fathers' rights" because it ruled that a Florida man’s paternity notice was considered filed when it was recorded, not received, by the state. The high court reversed and remanded the trial court decision holding that the birthfather failed to assert his paternal rights before the birthmother consented to adoption, and ordered the lower court to determine if the Office of Vital Records and Statistics received his notice prior to her action. On Jan. 27, the Utah Supreme Court reversed a district court's order that had allowed the termination of an unwed Colorado father's rights to his biological daughter, whom the mother had placed for adoption in Utah without his consent, finding there was no basis to conclude the father knew or reasonably could have known what occurred. To read the November decision, go to: http://bit.ly/UbJQPB. to read a Salt Lake Tribune article, "Florida man gets a shot at being a dad," go to: http://bit.ly/Tl5Y9c; to read the January decision, go to: http://bit.ly/SdBw1Z.

 

Education & Advocacy

INSTITUTE, PARTNERS WORK TO PRESERVE FEDERAL TAX CREDIT BEYOND 2012
According to Voice for Adoption, the Making Adoption Affordable Act (S3616 and HR4373) will not be addressed as stand-alone legislation, but in an overall tax "extender" bill that the 112th Congress will consider before it concludes in December. There is concern that an extension may not include a refundability provision and likely will not be made permanent, but there is still time to advocate for these provisions. To show support for the credit, urge your U.S. Senators and Representatives to become co-sponsors of S3616 and HR4373. Without new legislation, the current $12,650 credit will not be refundable for 2012 and will expire at year-end; in 2013, only those adopting children with special needs would be eligible for $6,000 in qualifying expenses. To find your Senators' names, go to: http://1.usa.gov/3UAs; for Representatives, go to: http://1.usa.gov/prsjAl and enter your zip code. Call 202-225-3121 and ask for his/her office; tell the child welfare/tax staffer that you are a constituent (provide your mailing address if leaving a message). To see if your lawmakers are already cosponsors, go to: http://1.usa.gov/iZaESp and search by bill number. For advocacy resources, go to: http://bit.ly/SawuDk.

To view the State Policy and Advocacy Resource Center and North American Council on Adoptable Children adoption tax credit webinar, go to: http://bit.ly/WtgtYQ. To read a Nov. 13 column by Kathleen Strottman, executive director of the Congressional Coalition on Adoption Institute, "Congress: Save adoption tax credit" in the Washington Times, go to: http://bit.ly/TiVDKz; an Oct. 29 New York Times column, "Make Sure the Neediest Are Covered," by Joe Kroll, executive director of NACAC, go to: http://nyti.ms/10Oa7Z8; a Nov. 21 article on FoxNews.com, "Dive off fiscal cliff could be 'disastrous' for orphans, foster children, say advocates" by Joshua Rhett Miller, go to: http://fxn.ws/SnwIZo; and a Nov. 27 Orlando, Florida wftv.com article, "Tax credit for adoptive parents to end," go to: http://bit.ly/TtWZVE.

 

Research

RESEARCH SHOWS SELF-DETERMINATION IS VITAL FOR TRANSITION FROM CARE
In an effort to enhance outcomes for young people transitioning out of foster care, researchers studied the efficacy of an intervention to improve the self-determination skills of adolescents. Using a randomized design, 69 high-risk foster youth, ages 16.5 to 17.5 years, were assigned to either a self-determination intervention (TAKE CHARGE) or an independent living program. "My Life: Effects of a Longitudinal, Randomized Study of Self-Determination Enhancement on the Transition Outcomes of Youth in Foster Care and Special Education" by Laurie Powers, Sarah Geenen, et al., is in the current issue of Children and Youth Services Review (Volume 34, Issue 11). Assessments showed substantial improvements at both post-intervention and one year follow-up. Differences between the groups were related to self-determination, quality of life and utilization of community transition services. Researchers also found youth in the intervention group were more likely to complete high school, be employed and be able to carry out independent living activities at notably higher rates than the comparison youth. To read an abstract, go to: http://bit.ly/V2DsZN.

STUDY EXAMINES FACTORS RELATED TO POSITIVE OUTCOMES FOR FOSTER YOUTH
Research examining which factors predicted positive outcomes for Latino, Black and Caucasian former foster youth, based on a subsample of interview data from 805 foster care alumni, found significant differences based on race and ethnicity. After controlling for gender, age, placement instability and circumstances of foster care exits, there were significant differences by race/ethnicity in factors that contributed to high school/GED completion, employment and mental health outcomes. "Institutional Predictors of Developmental Outcomes among Racially Diverse Foster Care Alumni" by Antonio R. Garcia, Peter J. Pecora, et al., is in a recent issue of the American Journal of Orthopsychiatry (Volume 82, Issue 4). Researchers recommended using the findings to inform intervention and prevention programs for youth in care. To read an abstract, go to: http://1.usa.gov/TZyV9i.

ANALYSIS FINDS ADOPTION EFFECTIVE FOR CHILDREN’S EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT
An Italian study examining the attachment and emotional development of children who were internationally adopted beyond infancy (mean age at adoption=3.9 years) highlights the key role adoptive parents play in children’s emotional adjustment. "Attachment and Emotional Understanding: A Study on Late-Adopted Pre-Schoolers and their Parents" by Lavinia Barone and F. Lionetti is in the September issue of Child: Care, Health and Development (Volume 38, Issue 5). Using a longitudinal design with a sample of 20 adoptive families, the researchers analyzed both parent and child attachment styles and found the mother’s having a secure attachment style was a protective factor for children with disorganized attachment. The researchers concluded that adoption appears to be an effective intervention for children’s emotional development and attachment. To read an abstract, go to: http://bit.ly/Tt3ZUW.

WORKERS IN THREE COUNTRIES CITE SIMILAR REASONS FOR ADOPTIVE PLACEMENT
Researchers surveyed 299 child welfare workers in Norway, England and the U.S. regarding a recommendation for or against adoption by foster parents of a 3-year-old whose birthparents had not visited since he came into care at 5 months. Two-fifths (41%) of Norwegian workers did not support adoption, compared with 2-to-4 percent in England and the U.S. An analysis of reasons in favor of adoption, despite the birthmother’s lack of consent, revealed similarities across countries; the top three reasons were: parents’ behavior, child’s need for permanency and child’s attachment to foster parents. “Adoption in the Child Welfare System – A Cross-Country Analysis of Child Welfare Workers’ Recommendations For or Against Adoption,” by Marit Skivenes and Oyvind Tefre, is in the November issue of Children and Youth Services Review (Volume 34, Issue 11). Researchers found the majority of Norwegian workers’ recommendation for adoption was remarkable given the lack of policy support for it. To read an abstract, go to: http://bit.ly/TtMtOg.

Please go to the "From Our Partners" section to read the latest research from Adoption Quarterly.

 

News

WASHINGTON STATE REPORTEDLY ASKS FAMILIES TO REDUCE ADOPTION ASSISTANCE
According to "Request alarms local adoptive families" by Paris Achen in the Nov. 4 Columbian, Washington State’s Department of Social and Health Services, pursuant to a law passed this year, is asking 9,000 families who adopted children with special needs to voluntarily reduce the size of their monthly adoption subsidies. The letter reportedly asks parents to "review your family’s financial situation to determine whether your family can accommodate a reduction. ... The amount can be any amount you determine is feasible." The law also reduces the amount families can receive in adoption assistance to 80 percent of foster care maintenance payments for new contracts as of July 2013; currently, families can receive equal amounts. To read the article, go to: http://bit.ly/SqVRRn; to access the Adoption Institute’s advocacy resources to preserve funding for adoption assistance, go to: http://bit.ly/10OSbNW.

MI BILLS WOULD ALLOW AGENCIES TO DENY APPLICANTS FOR RELIGIOUS REASONS
A Nov. 28 article, "Legislation to discriminate in adoptions," on michiganradio.org by Lester Graham, reports on bills before the Michigan House of Representatives that would permit private adoption agencies with state contracts to reject prospective adoptive applicants on any moral or religious basis. The article notes, however, that "currently there is no proposal to restrict private adoption agencies’ religious rights or how they choose which qualified parents are able to adopt." Advocacy groups assert that the bills could undermine children’s best interests and may be a move to prevent gay and lesbian parents from adopting. To read the article, go to: http://bit.ly/Rl9ncf; to read the legislation and see its status, go to: http://1.usa.gov/Ya8R49 and search for HB5763 and HB5764. To read the Adoption Institute’s report, "Expanding Resources for Children III: Research-Based Best Practices in Adoption by Gays and Lesbians," go to: http://bit.ly/VdVpKF.

NC JUDGE ORDERS RETURN OF THREE AMERICAN-BORN BOYS TO DEPORTED FATHER
According to a Nov. 27 Associated Press article, "North Carolina judge orders return of 3 US-born children to their deported Mexican father," a state district court judge ruled that three sons should be reunited with their deported Mexican father. The county sought to terminate the father’s parental rights after he attempted to have his children move to Mexico and a home study found that the house did not have running water. The father and sons are currently living in North Carolina, and a hearing is scheduled for February to determine if he regains full custody. The U.S.-born boys were placed with foster families because their mother, an American citizen, was determined unable to care for them; the foster parents have moved to adopt the children. To read the article, go to: http://wapo.st/Uc9Eek.

U.N. CHILDREN’S RIGHTS PANEL SEEKS TO BAR USE OF 'BABY BOXES' IN EUROPE
A Nov. 25 Associated Press article, “Europe mulls banning 'boxes' for abandoned babies” by David Rising and Maria Cheng, reports that the U.N. Committee on the Rights of the Child called in October for a prohibition on the technically illegal "baby boxes," which facilitate anonymous infant abandonment and are available in about 11 European countries. According to the article, over "the last decade, hundreds of babies have been abandoned this way," though "limited academic surveys suggest this hasn't reduced the murder of infants." A member of the U.N. committee notes that the boxes -- akin to “safe havens” in the United States -- undercut children’s and parents’ rights, do not address the causes of abandonment and discourage women from accessing medical care. A few European countries permit anonymous births and adoptive placements, while several allow "concealed delivery" that offers confidential adoption and retains birthmothers' contact information for children who request it at age 18 or older. To read the article, go to: http://abcn.ws/QJ78j2; to read the Adoption Institute’s report on U.S. “safe haven” laws, go to: http://bit.ly/YmZHzX.

 

Resources

COALITION PROVIDES REPORT ON GUARDIANSHIP ASSISTANCE IMPLEMENTATION
The Children’s Defense Fund, Child Trends, Casey Family Programs and other organizations published a report in October on implementation of the Guardianship Assistance Program, established in the Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008. "Making it Work: Using the Guardianship Assistance Program (GAP) to Close the Permanency Gap for Children in Foster Care" discusses how key elements and challenges have been addressed by GAP programs in 29 states, Washington, D.C., and a Washington Indian tribe that received federal funding. To read the report, go to: http://bit.ly/SV8czl.

PUBLICATION SUMMARIZES LAWS ON ADOPTION ADVERTISING, INTERMEDIARIES
The Child Welfare Information Gateway released this month an updated brief, "Use of Advertising and Facilitators in Adoptive Placements," which summarizes state statutes regulating or limiting the use of advertising in adoption (30 states) and use of intermediaries or facilitators (41 states). To read the brief, go to: http://1.usa.gov/YqtesC.

CHART EXAMINES POTENTIAL IMPACT OF ‘FISCAL CLIFF’ ON FAMILY PROGRAMS
The National Human Services Assembly recently released a chart, “The Potential Impact of the Sequester on Selected Youth, Family, Aging and Disability Programs,” detailing how the possible 7.6–8.2 percent sequestration budget cuts (the so-called "fiscal cliff" currently being discussed in Washington) would impact social services programs. The table includes amounts for FY08-FY12 appropriations, FY13 President’s budget, sequestration, and changes in funding levels for programs including Adoption Assistance, Awareness, Opportunities and Incentives. To view the chart, go to: http://bit.ly/TnSVUf.

 

From Our Partners

ADOPTION QUARTERLY: PUTATIVE FATHER REGISTRIES RAISE ETHICAL ISSUES
Researchers review current law related to putative father registries (existing in almost half of the states) and indicate few men are aware of them. "Ethical Issues in the Use of Putative Father Registries in Infant Adoption: Implications for Administrators and Practitioners" by Larry Watson and Norman Cobb, is in the current issue of Adoption Quarterly (Volume 15, Issue 3). The authors discuss the application of ethical practices of confidentiality, social justice, fairness and respect in relation to men’s rights, as well as professional responsibility to birthfathers in adoption practice. To read an abstract, go to: http://bit.ly/TtLFsH.

ALP OFFERS WEBINAR IN JANUARY ON RAISING CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS
You are invited to join Martha Osborne, founder of RainbowKids.com, adopted person and adoptive mom, for a Jan. 17 webinar at 7 p.m. (Central Time) discussing disconnects between expectations and realities of raising a child with special needs. Osborne will also cover how other families have coped with these differences and resources to help you work through them, as well as answer questions. To register for the webinar, go to: http://bit.ly/U1sEdt.

SPENCE-CHAPIN OFFERS INFORMATIONAL WORKSHOPS AND WEBINAR
Spence-Chapin will present a workshop, Babies: An Instruction Manual, on Dec. 3 for families who have or are adopting children under age 2. Topics will include how to hold a baby, changing diapers, picking a pediatrician and more. On Dec. 8, Spence’s adoption specialists will present an International Adoption Information Meeting Webinar, concluding with a Q&A session. Looking ahead, the following workshops are on tap: Jan. 7, Domestic Adoption Information Meeting; Jan. 8, Adult Adoptee Panel; Jan. 22, Medical Issues in Internationally Adopted Children; and Jan. 28, Navigating the Path to Parenthood Between Fertility Treatments and Adoption. For more information and to register, go to: http://bit.ly/7qIbv7.

ADOPTION TODAY TODAY FEATURES FAMILIES WHO HELP ORPHANS AND POOR CHILDREN
Adoption Today will wrap up the year with a special December issue focusing on families formed by adoption who give back to organizations that help orphaned or impoverished children around the world. This issue concludes an incredible year for Adoption Today in which it was honored with a Media Award from the National Association of Social Workers. Don’t miss the December issue from this award-winning publication, plus the Donaldson Adoption Institute’s column –– and remember that a portion of every new subscription goes to support the Institute’s vital work. To access the magazine, go to: www.adoptinfo.net.

 

Institute Update

ANNUAL REPORT HIGHLIGHTS INSTITUTE ACTIVITIES, RESEARCH AND RESULTS
As the year draws to an end, please review our accomplishments and share our aspirations by reading our just-posted Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2012. Thanks to your support and that of hundreds of others, it was another period of important, high-impact achievements. The Annual Report is a great way to introduce people to the Institute’s work, so please forward this link to your friends and colleagues so they, too, can become a part of our community. For a sneak preview before hard copies hit the mail, go to: http://bit.ly/VaW9KW.

WELCOME TO OUR NEWEST SENIOR FELLOW, ESTEEMED RESEARCHER PENNY MAZA
The Institute is delighted to announce that Penelope (Penny) Maza, Ph.D., is joining us as a Senior Research Fellow. Penny has been a champion for children – – especially those in foster care – – for decades, with high-level positions in government and the nonprofit sector. Most recently she has worked as a consultant for organizations including the National Child Welfare Resource Center on Adoption and AdoptUSKids. Previously, she was the Senior Policy Research Analyst at the Children’s Bureau, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; prior to that, she held various positions at HHS and was the Director of Research for the Child Welfare League of America. We welcome Penny to the Institute’s team with gratitude and pride. To read our press release about Dr. Maza, go to: http://bit.ly/TyjMzM. To learn more about the Senior Fellows, go to: http://bit.ly/YyrEoD.

REMEMBER THE INSTITUTE FOR YOUR HOLIDAY GIFT LIST AND IN TAX PLANNING
It’s that time of year already: time to start thinking about holiday gifts – and about tax saving strategies; the Adoption Institute would be happy to help you on both counts. Why not show that someone special that you are thinking of them by making a donation in their name to the Institute? It's a great way to honor friends, family or professional contacts, and we will gladly notify them of your generosity. At the same time, if you would just as soon pass on another fruitcake or holiday necktie, we can help you let friends and family know that you would appreciate a donation be made to the Institute on your behalf.

We also invite you to think about a special form of giving to stretch your contribution by donating your appreciated securities to the Institute, a benefit to us even as you get a significant tax break. For more information or to discuss your giving plans, please contact Development Director William Boltz at: wboltz@adoptioninstitute.org or (212) 925-4089. To donate, go to: http://bit.ly/V2pqaF.

We cannot further our unique, high-impact initiatives without your support. We do not have an endowment, so your year-end gift will make a real difference in our work to improve the lives of children and families in 2013 and far beyond.

IN THE MEDIA: THE INTERNET’S ROLE, CHRISTIAN ADOPTIONS, A WEBINAR AND MORE
Executive Director Adam Pertman recently was interviewed about the internet’s role in adoptions. On Oct. 31, CBS Miami carried a story entitled, "How Social Media Is Changing Adoption." Pertman said the Adoption Institute is conducting the first-ever research on the subject (which will be published in December) in order to better understand this historic phenomenon and create best practices to serve children and families. “It is inventing itself before our eyes,” he said. To read the article, go to: http://cbsloc.al/TgqwiW; to read one on az.family.com, go to: http://bit.ly/WRNToV.

On Nov. 26, Pertman was interviewed by the "Take Two" show on KPCC, a Southern California National Public Radio station. The conversation focused on prospective parents utilizing the Internet to adopt, and discussed the positives and risks of doing so. Pertman described the impact of the internet, and social media in particular, as historic in many ways. To hear the interview, go to: http://bit.ly/WtNioz.

On Nov. 4, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette ran a story, "Christians across Pittsburgh help evolve approach to adoption" about the parents of four children who adopted an infant from Ethiopia last year. They were described as part of a cross-country Christian "orphan care movement," which encourages international adoptions and supports domestic foster care as part of its mission. In the story, Pertman said families need to be educated to understand that they need the right resources in order to meet children’s needs. To read the article, go to: http://bit.ly/TeQjI6.

On Oct. 21, philly.com introduced Stanley and Kensly Printemps Owens, two Haitian children who were adopted by a Philadelphia family. The story chronicles their journey from the day they were brought to the orphanage in Haiti by their mother to their present-day lives with their adoptive family. Pertman was quoted as saying, in part, "It can be traumatizing in and of itself to be plucked from your home, your culture, known places." To read the article, go to: http://bit.ly/V23psr.

On Nov. 29, Pertman presented a webinar hosted by the American Adoption Congress titled "The End of Closed Adoption?" His focus was on two Adoption Institute reports: "Openness in Adoption" which among its findings said that only about 5 percent of infant adoptions today are fully "closed," and "Untangling the Web: The Internet’s Transformative Impact on Adoption," which will be published in December and will describe the historic changes being spurred by new technology, including by making it far easier than ever to search for and find birth relatives. To listen to an archived recording, go to: http://bit.ly/StrWru.

UPCOMING STAFF APPEARANCES
The following is a partial listing of upcoming appearances and/or presentations by Pertman and Institute senior staff. For a complete list, go to: http://bit.ly/bPNVDc. To inquire about Institute staff availability for speaking engagements, call 212-925-4089 or email info@adoptioninstitute.org.

  • December 2 – Executive Director Pertman will present "Untangling the Web: How the Internet has Transformed Adoption … and Our Lives" during a breakfast program hosted by JCFS and held at Beth Hillel Congregation Bnai Emunah in Wilmette, IL. For more information and to register, go to: http://bit.ly/V8zBA2.

  • January 12 – Pertman will lead a panel discussion entitled "Adoption: What Are My Choices?" at The Fertility Planit Show that will be held at the Hyatt Century Plaza in Los Angeles. For more information and to register, go to: http://bit.ly/UnWjly.

 

About the Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute

Since its establishment in 1996, the Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute has been a pre-eminent, independent voice for improving adoption for everyone it touches – particularly children – through innovative programs, educational initiatives, research and analysis, and advocacy for better practices, policies and laws.

Our award-winning web site, www.adoptioninstitute.org/old, is a popular and reliable source for accurate adoption information. Re-read our past e-Newsletters at: http://bit.ly/archivednewsletter.


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