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1. Law & Policy
- Senate Bill Would Reshape Intercountry Adoption Policy, Procedures
- Legislation Seeks Changes in Many Child Welfare Adoption Provisions
- House Incentives Measure Focuses on Increasing Adoptions from Care
- Act Would Enhance Supports and Services, Including for Mental Health
- House Legislation Would Refocus 'Adoption' Incentives to 'Permanency'
- Immigration Policy Aims to Protect Parental Rights of Detainees

2. Education & Advocacy
- Institute: Action Needed to Address Internet 'Re-Homing' of Children
- Institute Calls for Greater Protection of Birth/First Parent Rights
- Institute Provides Comments to Senate Panel on Mental Health Services

3. Research
- Institute Seeks Participants for Critical New Adoption-Internet Study
- Analysis Finds Surrender Documents Did Not Promise Confidentiality
- Lack of Adoption Preparation Associated with Behavioral Challenges
- Commodification of Adoption in Media Coverage Connected to Stigma
- Study Finds Link between Parenting and Shyness in Adopted Toddlers

4. News
- Magazine Article Reports on 'The New Anti-Adoption Movement'
- Evangelical Christians Reportedly Encouraging Intercountry Adoption
- Internet Speeds Up Searches for Birthparents -- and Raises Issues
- Stories Examine Adoption Internationally and of Black Children from U.S.

5. Resources
- Resources Available for 2013 National Adoption Day and Month
- Webinar Focuses on Strategies to Raise Foster Care Adoption Awareness
- 'Extreme Recruitment Toolbox' Designed for Hard-to-Place Children
- Dave Thomas Foundation Honors 2013 Adoption Friendly Workplaces
- LSS of IL Offers Lifebook Materials for Foster and Adopted Children

6. Institute Update
- Warmest Thanks to Two Special Families for Their Gifts to the Institute
- In The Media: Adoption Competency and Adoption in the Schools
- Upcoming Staff Appearances

7. From Our Partners
- Adoption Today: What's in Store for Intercountry Adoption's Future
- Adoption Learning Partners Webinar: Nutrition and Adopted Children
- Spence-Chapin: Variety of Support Groups, Meetings Offered in October

 

Law & Policy

SENATE BILL WOULD RESHAPE INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTION POLICY, PROCEDURES
Sen. Landrieu and eight other senators on Sept. 19 introduced the Children in Families First Act of 2013 (S.1530), which would make fundamental changes in U.S. policy and processes relating to intercountry adoption "so that seeking permanent families for children living without families receives more prominence, focus, and resources," among other goals. A new State Department Bureau of Vulnerable Children and Family Security would become the U.S. Central Authority (succeeding the department's Office of Children's Issues), and the Department of Homeland Security's U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) would become responsible for many key responsibilities. USCIS also could "determine, on a case-by-case basis, that a specific intercountry adoption case may proceed as a non-Convention adoption" from countries that have ratified the Hague Convention; relax requirements for relative adoptions; and permit undefined "parole" status to transfer custody of some children. The bill would also significantly alter application of "subsidiarity," the principle that prioritizes placing children within their nations of origin, saying there should be concurrent planning for intercountry adoptions. The bill is in the Foreign Relations Committee.

LEGISLATION SEEKS CHANGES IN MANY CHILD WELFARE ADOPTION PROVISIONS
Sen. Rockefeller (D-WV) and Sen. Casey (D-PA) on Sept. 17 introduced the Removing Barriers to Adoption and Supporting Families Act of 2013 (S.1511) to reauthorize the Adoption Incentives program through 2017 and make several changes to child welfare adoption policy. New provisions would add an award for interstate adoptions, to be shared between sending and receiving states; require national standards for state home studies; eliminate "another planned permanent living arrangement" for children under 17; require states to use 20 percent of their adoption assistance delink savings for post-adoption and post-permanency services; dedicate 10 percent of Promoting Safe and Stable Families Funds each to adoption promotion and post-adoption and post-permanency services; encourage states to identify "evidence-based child-focused recruitment practices;" and promote placement with siblings. The legislation defines post-adoption and post-permanency services as "services for children placed in adoptive, kinship, or guardianship placements and their families," including individual counseling, group counseling, family counseling, case management, respite care, training, assistance to adoptive parent organizations, assistance to support groups and program evaluation. The bill is with the Finance Committee. Read the Institute's "Keeping the Promise" and "Never Too Old."

HOUSE INCENTIVES MEASURE FOCUSES ON INCREASING ADOPTIONS FROM CARE
Reps. Levin (D-MI), Camp (R-MI), Doggett (D-TX) and Reichert (R-WA) on Sept. 27 introduced the Promoting Adoption and Legal Guardianship for Children in Foster Care Act (H.R.3205) to reauthorize the Adoption Incentives program through FY2016. The legislation would restructure awards to incentivize increasing adoptions of pre-adolescent (9-13 years old) and older children, and establish a new award for increases in the rate of children leaving foster care for legal guardianship. It would also mandate that states report savings resulting from the adoption assistance-income eligibility de-link and reinvestments in child welfare, as well as spend a minimum of 20 percent of savings on post-adoption services for children adopted from care. Read a summary of the bill, and summary of the differences between the bill and Aug. discussion draft. Ask your Representatives to co-sponsor H.R.3205. Call 202-225-3121 and ask for his/her office; tell the child welfare/tax staffer that you are a constituent (provide your mailing address if leaving a message) and encourage your legislators to co-sponsor H.R.3205 (see if your lawmakers already are cosponsors).

ACT WOULD ENHANCE SUPPORTS AND SERVICES, INCLUDING FOR MENTAL HEALTH
Sens. Klobuchar (D-MN), Blunt (R-MO) and Landrieu (D-LA) on Sept. 19 introduced the Supporting Adoptive Families Act (S.1527) to enhance pre- and post-adoption support services; it was referred to the Finance Committee. The bill seeks to ensure "the well-being of adopted children and their adoptive families" and promote efforts "to prevent such children from entering the foster care system through the provision of pre- and post-adoptive support services." The legislation would require states to spend "a significant portion" of their adoption assistance de-link savings on such services; establish grants for post-adoption mental health services; define adoption competency and post-adoption mental health services; and allocate $20 million for post-adoption mental health services. It also would mandate that the Department of Health and Human Services collect data on disruptions and dissolutions for domestic and intercountry adoptions. Read the Institute's Aug. report, "A Need To Know: Enhancing Adoption Competence Among Mental Health Professionals."

HOUSE LEGISLATION WOULD REFOCUS 'ADOPTION' INCENTIVES TO 'PERMANENCY'
Rep Davis (D-IL) introduced the Investing in Permanency for Youth in Foster Care Act (H.R.3124) on Sept. 18, which would change Adoption Incentives awards to "Permanency" awards for exits to reunification, adoption and guardianship; it was referred to the Committee on Ways and Means. Awards would be made for these three types of exits for increases over projected numbers for the fiscal year, as well as increases over the base year (2012) for children who are older (14 years old and over), pre-adolescent (9-13), and young (0-8) with special needs. It also would require states to use all incentive payments to fund post-permanency services, which are defined as those "needed once children and youth have been reunified, adopted, or placed with guardians to stabilize and support the child and family." H.R. 3124 would authorize the program through 2017, with funding at $60 million for FY2014-2018 (up from $43 million).

IMMIGRATION POLICY AIMS TO PROTECT PARENTAL RIGHTS OF DETAINEES
The U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) on Aug. 23 issued a directive, Facilitating Parental Interests in the Course of Civil Immigration Enforcement Activities, stating that "ICE personnel should ensure that the agency's immigration enforcement activities do not unnecessarily disrupt the parental rights of both alien parents or legal guardians of minor children." The policy provides that the agency "will maintain a comprehensive process for identifying, placing, monitoring, accommodating, and removing alien parents or legal guardians of minor children while safeguarding their parental rights." In May, the Senate Judiciary Committee passed an amendment sponsored by Sens. Al Franken (D-MN) and Chuck Grassley (R-IA), the Humane Enforcement and Legal Protections for Separated Children Act" (HELP Separated Children Act), to the immigration reform bill (S744). The Act seeks to protect children whose parents are involved in immigration enforcement actions and keep them out of the child welfare system when it is not necessary to ensure their safety. The Applied Research Center has found that 5,100 children in foster care are prevented from uniting with their detained or deported parents, and in the next five years, an additional 15,000 children may be in the same situation.

 

Education & Advocacy


INSTITUTE: ACTION NEEDED TO ADDRESS INTERNET 'RE-HOMING' OF CHILDREN
The Institute issued a media advisory on Sept. 10 calling on law enforcement officials, policymakers and adoption professionals nationwide to investigate and put a stop to "re-homing" – in which some Americans are using the Internet to find new families for their adopted children. The Institute recommended legal, regulatory and practice changes to better protect children and to support families in crisis "so that no one ever feels that deserting their child is their last resort." Pertman stated, "The stories about 're-homing' ... are certainly exceptions in the world of adoption, but they also are unnerving and should serve as a wakeup call for us all to finally pay attention and take much-needed action." The State Department issued an Adoption Notice on Sept. 18, saying it is "committed to ensuring that reliable safeguards for the wellbeing of children are in place." National adoption and child welfare organizations responded on Sept. 11, calling on Congress to fund support services for adoptive families. Reuters ran an article on Sept. 13, " Governments call on U.S. to track foreign adoptees," quoting Pertman saying "It's so risky for everyone involved, it's nuts." Russia and China also expressed serious concern. The New York Times and NBC News covered the "re-homing" story as well. Pertman discussed the issue with the Reuter's reporter who broke the story on PBS Newshour on Sept. 11 and on BBC World News.

INSTITUTE CALLS FOR GREATER PROTECTION OF BIRTH/FIRST PARENT RIGHTS
The Institute issued a statement on Sept. 27 in response to "Baby Veronica's" return to her adoptive parents, urging better education about and protection of first/birth parent rights, saying that – as in this case – they too often are undervalued, misunderstood or ignored. The Institute – which was a party to an amicus brief filed with the U.S. Supreme Court supporting Veronica's Cherokee father, and whose publication " Safeguarding the Rights and Well-Being of Birthparents" was used by Native American groups supporting him in their own court filings – said: "Undercutting the rights of these men and women does more than just harm the affected adults; most pointedly, it deprives children of the care of the people who created them and of their own family connections." The Institute is expanding its work focused on birth/first parents with funding provided by its new Lynn Franklin Fund, a dedicated source for research and advocacy on the issues and concerns that matter most for this too-often-neglected population. A Sept. 22 Post and Courier article, " Skeptics of Veronica, Desaray cases call for closer look at private adoptions, laws," by Andrew Knapp quotes Pertman as saying, "We give lip service to the best interests of the child, then we do things that prove the adoptive couple are the only people we're concerned about."

INSTITUTE PROVIDES COMMENTS TO SENATE PANEL ON MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
The Senate Finance Committee sought input "on how to improve the mental health system in the U.S." by identifying barriers, as well as policies that improve outcomes and access to and quality of care. Additionally, Voice for Adoption asked adoptive parents and professionals to inform its comments by completing a survey on foster adoptive children and families' challenges in accessing mental health services.

 

Research

INSTITUTE SEEKS PARTICIPANTS FOR CRITICAL NEW ADOPTION-INTERNET STUDY
The Internet and social media are changing the way adoption occurs throughout the world, yet we know little about the way social media and other elements of this modern technology affect the millions of people for whom adoption is part of everyday life. The Donaldson Adoption Institute has embarked on a new study seeking information from adopted persons, adoptive parents, parents who have placed children for adoption, and adoption professionals about their adoption-related use of the Internet and social media. This research is a follow-up to our 2012 report, Untangling the Web: The Internet's Transformative Impact on Adoption. To participate in the survey, please click here.

ANALYSIS FINDS SURRENDER DOCUMENTS DID NOT PROMISE CONFIDENTIALITY
A legal scholar who analyzed 75 surrender documents by first/birth mothers from 1936-1970s and 26 states concluded that the documents did not provide women with promises of confidentiality or guarantees of anonymity. "Surrender and Subordination: Birth Mothers and Adoption Law Reform," by Elizabeth Samuels, in the 2013 issue of the Michigan Journal of Gender & Law (Volume 20), gives an in-depth history of efforts to provide adult adoptees access to original birth certificates, finding that the most powerful resistance to restoring access has rested on the argument that first/birth mothers should be protected. These women, however, were not offered a choice of confidentiality, nor were they guaranteed this in legal documents. Forty percent of the documents indicated that the woman promised she would not try to find the child or interfere with the adoptive family.

LACK OF ADOPTION PREPARATION ASSOCIATED WITH BEHAVIORAL CHALLENGES
A longitudinal study of 120 adoptive families, including three subsamples of those headed by lesbian, gay and heterosexual couples, found that lack of parent preparation for the adoption and parental depression were associated with more parent-reported externalizing and internalizing behavior problems in their children (adopted before 18 months of age). "Predictors of Psychological Adjustment in Early Placed Adopted Children With Lesbian, Gay, and Heterosexual Parents," by Abbie Goldberg (an Adoption Institute Senior Research Fellow) and JuliAnna Smith, is in the June issue of the Journal of Family Psychology (Volume 27, Issue 3). The study also found the adopted toddlers' behavior problem scores were lower than the standardized scores of non-referred children, and they did not differ by family type. Read the Institute's report on Adoptive Parent Preparation.

COMMODIFICATION OF ADOPTION IN MEDIA COVERAGE CONNECTED TO STIGMA
A qualitative study of language used in media coverage of adoption, "Adopting Commodities: A Burkean Cluster Analysis of Adoption Rhetoric," by Jennifer Potter, is in the current issue of the Institute's partner publication, Adoption Quarterly (Volume 16, Issue 2). The analysis focused on the first of five major themes identified in media coverage of adoption: commodification of adoption (the other themes are biologization of adoption, renaming adoption, emphasizing parents and deemphasizing children, and biology versus adoption). Terminology that frames adoption as a commodity includes: supply and demand, marketplace, parents as consumers, children as products, costs, and "returning" children. The author concludes that such language contributes to stigma felt by some adoptive families.

STUDY FINDS LINK BETWEEN PARENTING AND SHYNESS IN ADOPTED TODDLERS
"Transactions Between Child Social Wariness and Observed Structured Parenting: Evidence From a Prospective Adoption Study," by Misaki Natsuaki, Leslie Leve et al., in the September/October issue of Child Development (Volume 84, Issue 5), provides the latest installment of the Early Growth and Development Study. This longitudinal study of 361 adopted children, their adoptive parents and birth parents, examines the influence of nature and nurture in child development. Researchers found that shyness in toddlers at age 27 months is not associated with first mothers' history of fear-related anxiety disorders; it is linked with low levels of structured parenting (less directive, fewer commands), particularly in mothers, and results indicated that increasing structured parenting may help reduce levels of shyness in children.

Please go to the "From Our Partners" section to read the latest research from Adoption Quarterly.

 

News

MAGAZINE ARTICLE REPORTS ON `THE NEW ANTI-ADOPTION MOVEMENT'
A Sept. 1 New Republic article, "Meet the New Anti-Adoption Movement: The surprising next frontier in reproductive justice," by Emily Matchar, reports on the personal experiences of some birth parents who regret their decision to place their children for adoption. The article states that "people are increasingly realizing that the industry is not nearly as well-regulated and ethical as it should be. There are issues of coercion, corruption, and lack of transparency that are only now being fully addressed." The story goes on to say that activists have been successful in organizing rallies and winning recent legislative victories to ensure better policies are implemented; that they support a ban on adoption agencies offering monetary support to pregnant women; and that more time should be provided after childbirth to decide whether to relinquish parental rights. Read the Institute's "Safeguarding the Rights and Well-Being of Birthparents in the Adoption Process."

EVANGELICAL CHRISTIANS REPORTEDLY ENCOURAGING INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTION
In a Sept. 21 New York Times article, "The Evangelical Orphan Boom," Kathryn Joyce reports on the growing trend of the evangelical Christian movement in urging Christians to adopt orphans from overseas. The article states that "Christian advocates of transnational adoption will often say that some 150 million children need homes though that figure, derived from a UNICEF report, includes not only parentless children, but also those who have lost only one parent, and orphans who live with relatives." The story notes that finding infants for intercountry adoptions can include "alarming" practices such as falsely informing birth parents their children will only be sent away temporarily.

INTERNET SPEEDS UP SEARCHES FOR BIRTHPARENTS –– AND RAISES ISSUES
A Sept. 15 The Herald Journal News article, "Who are my parents? Adopted individuals find new ways to track roots in internet age," by Lis Stewart, recounts the personal stories of some adoptees' attempts at searching for their birth/first parents, describing mixed emotions as they embark on the complex journey of finding the pieces from their past. According to the article, although the Internet has made the search for relatives relatively easy through the use of social media, it has also stirred up emotions adoptees are often unprepared to handle. Internet search and reunion has raised a whole new range of challenges in open and closed adoption practice. Read the Institute's report on the Internet's transformative impact on adoption, "Untangling the Web."

STORIES EXAMINE ADOPTION INTERNATIONALLY AND OF BLACK CHILDREN FROM U.S.
Two CNN articles published on Sept. 17 "International Adoptions in decline as number of orphans grows," by Kevin Voigt and Sophie Brown, and "Overseas adoptions rise –– for black American children," by Sophie Brown. report on changes and trends in adoption rates. New regulations and growing sentiment in some countries against intercountry adoption, with greater focus on placing them domestically, is leading to a steep drop in the adoptions by Americans of children from abroad. "The new rules were made to protect the interests of children as the demand from countries outstripped the supply of orphans," said Lu Ying, director of the China Center for Adoption Affairs.

In a Sept. 23 article, "Adoptions on the decline, advocates blame costly, time-consuming regulations," by Emma Penrod and Lois M. Collins in Deseret News, Pertman advises, "The solutions, I think, are less blanket solutions. Blanket solutions are less child-friendly than more tailored solutions." The second CNN article reports on an increase in adoptions of Black American children adopted by families in other nations, attributed to pregnant women in the U.S. wanting their children to face less discrimination and the relative ease of the process. "I think a lot of Americans are surprised that we are one of those sending countries," Pertman is quoted as saying. Pertman's CNN quotes are also included in a Sept. 23 Tulsa World article, "Dutch seemingly color-blind when adopting," by Adam Daigle.

 

Resources

RESOURCES AVAILABLE FOR 2013 NATIONAL ADOPTION DAY AND MONTH
The U.S. Children's Bureau, in partnership with AdoptUSKids, hosts the 2013 National Adoption Month website, with resources for professionals, adoptive parents, youth and a "Spread the Word" section with more information on working with the media. This year's theme, "Partnering for Permanency," underscores the need to create partnerships to find permanent connections for children in foster care. National Adoption Day, Nov. 23, is dedicated to raising awareness of and celebrating adoption of children in foster care. The initiative – sponsored by the Freddie Mac Foundation, Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption and three other partners – offers a website with materials for hosting events, fact sheets, family stories, public service announcements and other resources. In 2012, more than 4,500 children were adopted on National Adoption Day in cities across the United States.

WEBINAR FOCUSES ON STRATEGIES TO RAISE FOSTER CARE ADOPTION AWARENESS
The U.S. Children's Bureau, AdoptUSKids and Child Welfare Information Gateway are hosting a free webinar, "Partnering for Permanence: Creative Strategies for Raising Awareness About Adoption from Foster Care," on Oct. 2. Among other topics, the program will cover "effective ways that child welfare program leaders and public information officers can partner with each other to develop and implement effective communication strategies to raise awareness about adoption from foster care and support the child welfare agency's recruitment efforts."

'EXTREME RECRUITMENT TOOLBOX' DESIGNED FOR HARD-TO-PLACE CHILDREN
The Foster & Adoptive Care Coalition's "Extreme Recruitment" program that works with the hardest-to-place children, ages 10-18, in a very intensive and structured approach is offering an Extreme Recruitment Toolbox. The toolbox contains ten resources including forms for referrals and weekly action plans, timelines, checklists, and supporting documents.

DAVE THOMAS FOUNDATION HONORS 2013 ADOPTION FRIENDLY WORKPLACES
The Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption (DTFA) recently named the 2013 U.S. Top 100 best adoption-friendly workplaces, recognizing "companies with the best adoption benefits available to their employees." DTFA also created lists by industry and company size. Order DTFA's free "Adoption Benefits for the Workplace" toolkit.

LSS OF IL OFFERS LIFEBOOK MATERIALS FOR FOSTER AND ADOPTED CHILDREN
"Lifebooks Help Kids Heal, One Page at a Time," an article in the summer issue of Eye on LSSI, discusses how the Lutheran Social Services of Illinois Lifebook program assists children and their foster parents. The LSSI website offers "My Awesome Life," a Lifebook developed by social workers "to help foster or adopted children understand and record their life stories, preserve birth family connections and make sense of trauma, loss and change, while also celebrating their unique strengths and talents." Professionals can order versions for children in foster care, those returning home from foster care, and those adopted from foster care, as well as access a training curriculum and DVD.

 

Institute Update

WARMEST THANKS TO TWO SPECIAL FAMILIES FOR THEIR GIFTS TO THE INSTITUTE
This summer, the Institute was honored to be the beneficiary of memorials created by two wonderful families as tributes to their loved ones. We would like to offer our most heartfelt thanks and deepest condolences to the families of Albert Macks and Terry Franklin. Gifts in memory of Albert Macks will be used to support a range of Institute initiatives, while those given in Terry Franklin's name were contributed to our Lynn Franklin Fund. The Fund is named in honor of one of Terry's daughters, a longtime Institute Board member, author, literary agent and first mother. The Fund supports targeted research, education and advocacy for first/birth parent rights. If you would like to honor a treasured loved one in this way, please email Development Director, William Boltz, or call him at 212-925-4089. Learn more about the Lynn Franklin Fund.

IN THE MEDIA: ADOPTION COMPETENCY AND ADOPTION IN THE SCHOOLS
A Sept. 3 Christian Science Monitor blog, "Adoption competency training: A new goal for mental health professionals" discusses the Institute's recently released A Need to Know: Enhancing Adoption Competence among Mental Health Professionals. Executive Director Adam Pertman states in the article: "It's something a lot of people want, and a lot of people are looking for, and they simply can't find it," adding, "Unfortunately people sometimes find mental health professionals who mean well, but their lack of knowledge leads them to do more harm than good – and that's a problem." The Institute is seeking to raise awareness among mental health professionals about the nature and importance of adoption clinical competence, to heighten their desire to receive such training, and to identify various means by which the relevant knowledge and skills can be obtained.

On Sept. 4, Huffington Post ran a commentary by Institute Executive Director Adam Pertman and Program & Project Director Susan Smith, "A Lot to Learn: As the School Year Begins," in which they discuss the need for educators to learn more about adoption issues. "Teachers need to be prepared with both sensitivity and knowledge about adoption in order to assist all children and their families in successfully dealing with issues on an ongoing basis," the authors write. Bringing awareness to educators about the realities of foster care and adoption is an important diversity issue, as children should not be stigmatized as a result of their family type. You can also read the commentary on Pertman's blog and read the Institute's "Adoption in the Schools: A Lot to Learn."

UPCOMING STAFF APPEARANCES
The following is a partial listing of upcoming appearances and/or presentations by Pertman and Institute senior staff; view a complete list. To inquire about Institute staff availability for speaking engagements, call 212-925-4089 or email [email protected]

  • October 22 – Pertman will be the keynote presenter and will also participate in a panel discussion at a conference sponsored by Adoptions From The Heart. The conference will take place at Wesleyan Excley Science Center on the campus of Wesleyan University in Middletown, CT.

 

From Our Partners

ADOPTION TODAY: WHAT'S IN STORE FOR INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTION'S FUTURE
As the number of children adopted internationally has diminished over the last few years, many have questioned what is in store for the future of intercountry adoption. The October issue of Adoption Today examines new legislation being introduced to help encourage countries to re-open intercountry adoption programs, as well as to address domestic adoption. The issue also includes several articles from adult adoptees who are working to move intercountry adoption practices forward. Other topics covered include residential treatment centers and prejudice and the adopted child.

ADOPTION LEARNING PARTNERS WEBINAR: NUTRITION AND ADOPTED CHILDREN
Adoption Learning Partners is hosting a webinar on Nov. 5, "The Scoop on Nutrition and the Adopted Child." Dr. Dana Johnson (an Adoption Institute Senior Research Fellow) will discuss how poor nutrition in the early years can cause physical, cognitive and behavioral challenges and will help parents, especially those who have adopted internationally, recognize warning signs of malnutrition and will offer strategies and advice.

SPENCE-CHAPIN: VARIETY OF SUPPORT GROUPS, MEETINGS OFFERED IN OCTOBER
Spence-Chapin will present a variety of support groups and meetings in October including: Adopted Teens, Adult Adoptees, Birth Parents, Adoptive Parents, and LGBT Adoptive Parents Support Groups. Trainings include strategies for recruiting, matching and conducting culturally competent home assessments with prospective LGBT parents. There are also adult adoptee panels, where adoptees will share their unique insights into ways adoption has impacted their lives, and an annual Halloween Bash open to all those who have been touched by adoption.

 

About the Donaldson Adoption Institute

Since its establishment in 1996, the Adoption Institute has been a pre-eminent, independent voice for improving adoption for everyone it touches – particularly children – through innovative programs, educational initiatives, research and analysis, and advocacy for better practices, policies and laws.

Our award-winning website is a popular and reliable source for accurate adoption information. Re-read our past e-Newsletters.


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